Diet - Weight Loss - Feed http://dietandweightloss.tips4all.eu news from around Fri, 23 Jun 2017 14:33:11 +0000 en-US https://wordpress.org/?v=4.8 76137576 One week. 52 senators. Can Mitch McConnell get it done?http://dietandweightloss.tips4all.eu/one-week-52-senators-can-mitch-mcconnell-get-it-done/ Fri, 23 Jun 2017 14:30:48 +0000 http://dietandweightloss.tips4all.eu/?p=2847

Washington (CNN)The math isn't there yet for Mitch McConnell.

Within hours of the Senate majority leader unveiling a long-anticipated health care bill on Thursday, four of his Republican colleagues were quick to put a damper on things: "We are not ready to vote for this bill," the group said in a joint statement.
The swift rejection may be a negotiating ploy, but the public nature of it is a reminder for McConnell of the deep reservations running through his own conference on a proposal that conservatives do not believe goes far enough to repeal Obamacare -- and the monumental challenge that lies ahead as he looks for 50 "yes" votes.
    Over the next few days, McConnell needs to determine what concessions he can make to sway at least two of the four conservative senators -- but do so without losing support from the more moderate wing of the Senate, some of whom face tough re-elections next year.
    Sen. Ted Cruz, who along with Sens. Rand Paul, Mike Lee and Ron Johnson said they could not support the bill in its current form, told reporters Thursday afternoon that the real negotiations have only just begun -- and suggested he would be willing to swallow elements he doesn't care for.
    "Everyone's going to have to give. That's the only way you can get at least 50 out of 52 Republicans," Cruz said. "We have a very narrow majority."
    But McConnell doesn't have much time.
    He is aiming for a vote before members leave town ahead of the July 4 recess, giving Senate Republicans have just a handful of days to study a 142-page bill. And they will have even less time to consider the Congressional Budget Office's score of the bill -- and dramatic headlines of what it means for Americans' health care coverage -- once it's released early next week.
    Many of McConnell's colleagues, however, are confident that if anyone can find 50 votes, it's their majority leader -- a political tactician who knows Senate procedure inside and out.
    "Listen, I think Mitch's role is to choose to take a vote on this. I think that's what he's doing he's gone through a very exhaustive process of the input, and he's come up with a blue print that can still be amended and probably will be in reconciliation," said North Carolina Republican Sen. Richard Burr.
    "If anyone can get this done, it's him," South Dakota Sen. John Thune said.

      Protesters dragged away from senator's office

    The difficult votes to win

    On both the moderate and conservative sides of the party, some of the lawmakers that may be the toughest for McConnell to get to a yes are the same ones who may have to rely on his generosity for their re-elections.
    Sen. Dean Heller, a Nevada moderate, is facing re-election in a swing state that expanded Medicaid. On Thursday, he was among the first to release a statement raising "serious concerns about the bill's impact on the Nevadans who depend on Medicaid."
    Cruz, a conservative from deep-red Texas who is also up for re-election in 2018, also said that the bill didn't go far enough to lower premiums.
    But in both cases, McConnell has leverage. Cruz, for example, could face a primary challenge and would be well served to stay in the good graces of McConnell. Heller similarly will have to rely on national party support to help him win in Nevada, where former Democratic Senate Leader Harry Reid helped build an extensive political infrastructure.
    Also aiding McConnell is the fact that Republicans have campaigned on repealing and replacing Obamacare for more than seven years. If they vote against a repeal bill now, they will be charged with not fulfilling their years-long promise back home.
    Not to mention senators may have to face the ire of President Donald Trump if they vote against the bill.
    According to one GOP aide, Trump already made a call to Paul, and asked him personally to support the Senate bill days before its release.

      Rand Paul calls new GOP bill 'Obamacare-lite'

    Working in secret

    For weeks, McConnell's colleagues have publicly criticized his decision to write the bill behind closed doors.
    On Thursday, lawmakers reiterated those concerns, wondering out loud whether one week was enough to properly debate the contents of a bill aimed at overhauling the current health care system.
    "It's going to be very difficult because it is a complex bill and there are a lot of differing points of view on it too, which is the real problem," GOP Sen. Orrin Hatch told CNN.
    McConnell's dilemma is similar to what House Speaker Paul Ryan faced earlier this year when he struggled to get enough votes to get the House Republican bill through the lower chamber.
    In fact, the first time that Ryan brought up the legislation in March, it was premature, forcing him to yank the bill from the House floor before regrouping to pass it last month.
    "Moving from an opposition party to a governing party comes with growing pains," Ryan said at the time. "And well, we're feeling those growing pains today."

      Lankford on health bill: 'solid undecided'

    More From this publisher : HERE

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    Washington (CNN)The math isn't there yet for Mitch McConnell.

    Within hours of the Senate majority leader unveiling a long-anticipated health care bill on Thursday, four of his Republican colleagues were quick to put a damper on things: "We are not ready to vote for this bill," the group said in a joint statement.
    The swift rejection may be a negotiating ploy, but the public nature of it is a reminder for McConnell of the deep reservations running through his own conference on a proposal that conservatives do not believe goes far enough to repeal Obamacare -- and the monumental challenge that lies ahead as he looks for 50 "yes" votes.
      Over the next few days, McConnell needs to determine what concessions he can make to sway at least two of the four conservative senators -- but do so without losing support from the more moderate wing of the Senate, some of whom face tough re-elections next year.
      Sen. Ted Cruz, who along with Sens. Rand Paul, Mike Lee and Ron Johnson said they could not support the bill in its current form, told reporters Thursday afternoon that the real negotiations have only just begun -- and suggested he would be willing to swallow elements he doesn't care for.
      "Everyone's going to have to give. That's the only way you can get at least 50 out of 52 Republicans," Cruz said. "We have a very narrow majority."
      But McConnell doesn't have much time.
      He is aiming for a vote before members leave town ahead of the July 4 recess, giving Senate Republicans have just a handful of days to study a 142-page bill. And they will have even less time to consider the Congressional Budget Office's score of the bill -- and dramatic headlines of what it means for Americans' health care coverage -- once it's released early next week.
      Many of McConnell's colleagues, however, are confident that if anyone can find 50 votes, it's their majority leader -- a political tactician who knows Senate procedure inside and out.
      "Listen, I think Mitch's role is to choose to take a vote on this. I think that's what he's doing he's gone through a very exhaustive process of the input, and he's come up with a blue print that can still be amended and probably will be in reconciliation," said North Carolina Republican Sen. Richard Burr.
      "If anyone can get this done, it's him," South Dakota Sen. John Thune said.

        Protesters dragged away from senator's office

      The difficult votes to win

      On both the moderate and conservative sides of the party, some of the lawmakers that may be the toughest for McConnell to get to a yes are the same ones who may have to rely on his generosity for their re-elections.
      Sen. Dean Heller, a Nevada moderate, is facing re-election in a swing state that expanded Medicaid. On Thursday, he was among the first to release a statement raising "serious concerns about the bill's impact on the Nevadans who depend on Medicaid."
      Cruz, a conservative from deep-red Texas who is also up for re-election in 2018, also said that the bill didn't go far enough to lower premiums.
      But in both cases, McConnell has leverage. Cruz, for example, could face a primary challenge and would be well served to stay in the good graces of McConnell. Heller similarly will have to rely on national party support to help him win in Nevada, where former Democratic Senate Leader Harry Reid helped build an extensive political infrastructure.
      Also aiding McConnell is the fact that Republicans have campaigned on repealing and replacing Obamacare for more than seven years. If they vote against a repeal bill now, they will be charged with not fulfilling their years-long promise back home.
      Not to mention senators may have to face the ire of President Donald Trump if they vote against the bill.
      According to one GOP aide, Trump already made a call to Paul, and asked him personally to support the Senate bill days before its release.

        Rand Paul calls new GOP bill 'Obamacare-lite'

      Working in secret

      For weeks, McConnell's colleagues have publicly criticized his decision to write the bill behind closed doors.
      On Thursday, lawmakers reiterated those concerns, wondering out loud whether one week was enough to properly debate the contents of a bill aimed at overhauling the current health care system.
      "It's going to be very difficult because it is a complex bill and there are a lot of differing points of view on it too, which is the real problem," GOP Sen. Orrin Hatch told CNN.
      McConnell's dilemma is similar to what House Speaker Paul Ryan faced earlier this year when he struggled to get enough votes to get the House Republican bill through the lower chamber.
      In fact, the first time that Ryan brought up the legislation in March, it was premature, forcing him to yank the bill from the House floor before regrouping to pass it last month.
      "Moving from an opposition party to a governing party comes with growing pains," Ryan said at the time. "And well, we're feeling those growing pains today."

        Lankford on health bill: 'solid undecided'

      More From this publisher : HERE

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      Read Full Article Here: One week. 52 senators. Can Mitch McConnell get it done?
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      2847
      Saving the twins: Health scares and rehab for once-conjoined boyshttp://dietandweightloss.tips4all.eu/saving-the-twins-health-scares-and-rehab-for-once-conjoined-boys/ Fri, 23 Jun 2017 11:15:06 +0000 http://dietandweightloss.tips4all.eu/?p=2843

      Valhalla, New York (CNN)Nicole McDonald eases her silver minivan across Bear Mountain Bridge and hooks a right onto the steep two-lane highway.

      The road twists like a snake up the mountainous incline, an old route where the road's edge blends into beautiful greenery and perilous cliffs overlook the Hudson River. Where your knuckles turn white from clutching the steering wheel and a knot grows in your belly.
      Nicole makes this trip every day from her home in upstate New York to see her twin sons, Jadon and Anias. The 21-month-old boys are at Blythedale Children's Hospital 40 miles to the south, where they've been undergoing rehabilitation since mid-December. The twins, born joined at the head, captured the world's attention after a marathon surgery to separate them last fall.
        The journey to go see them, Nicole says, is similar to the one her boys have been through: setbacks and victories, nerve-wracking and awe-inspiring.
        "It's like climbing a mountain," she says, "and you get to the place you thought was the top only to realize you have another mile to go and you don't have the supplies for it."
        She thinks back to a moment weeks earlier when she reached a breaking point. Jadon and Anias had been sick off and on for nearly a month. Her other child, 3-year-old Aza, battled high fevers and croup. Amid it all, Mom got sick.
        But after a few days, finally, it seemed everyone was healthy. Nicole visited the boys at the rehabilitation center. Jadon fell asleep in his crib, and she worked to put Anias down. He was laughing, but in an instant, he unleashed a scream and vomited. Again and again, until nothing was left.
        Nicole stood, drenched in vomit, and held her 25-pound boy for more than six hours. Then, Jadon awoke, "just puking nonstop." She wondered why, after everything her boys have gone through, they couldn't seem to catch a break.
        In that moment, she closed her eyes. "I quit," she thought. "I can't do this anymore."

          A 360 look inside the operating room during the boys' surgery

        Seconds later, though, she snapped back. Amid the desperate exhaustion, she found strength. She became more focused, more determined, more resilient. Her boys needed her. Her family needed her.
        She didn't sleep for two days, tending to their every need.
        A physical therapist by training, she learned that she could rely on her instincts -- and that no matter what was thrown at her, she was strong enough to take it.
        "My 'I quit' moment shoved me into the mindset of 'I can do this,' " she says. "Not only can I handle it, I can handle it on my own. It was about being free, even though it's hard."
        She took that moment almost like a rallying cry for her boys. And she found it both exhilarating and rewarding: "I can be their mom without some nurse coming in every two seconds. Eventually, I'm going to have to do this at home. It was proof for me in that 'I quit' moment that I can."
        What drives her is the sheer joy that spreads across her boys' faces when she enters their room. Most of all, she just wants to bring them home.
        She mashes the accelerator on the road to see her boys.

        'Just trying to survive'

        Christian McDonald climbs the extension ladder and rips rotted wall studs from the outside of the family's split-level ranch house. His shirt is peeled off, and sweat drips from his chin.
        While Nicole works with the boys, Christian works to ready their newly purchased home for the twins' return. The work has allowed the former truck driver to return to his blue-collar roots. Knocking down walls and ripping up siding has been good for his soul, a way to relieve the stress of dealing with everything Jadon and Anias have gone through.
        The wood-shingled house, nestled in Orange County with views of the Catskill Mountains, is the family's third home in less than two years.
        In February 2016, they transported their lives from small-town Illinois to the Bronx to be near the Children's Hospital at Montefiore Medical Center, where the twins' surgery took place. They lived in a rental home for more than a year.
        Once the twins were moved to rehab at Blythedale, in Valhalla, the family moved too -- in part to get away from the hectic pace of the city.
        The house, which had been a foreclosure, is in need of what a real estate agent might call "a little TLC." The stairs leading up to the front door have been demolished -- one of many projects on Christian's to-do list. He's refinished one bathroom, turning it into showroom quality.
        Nicole and Christian hope to flip the home eventually; they say they wouldn't have been able to afford it if not for strangers who donated more than $330,000on their GoFundMe page. Neither parent has been able to work since their journey to New York began.
        "We're just trying to survive, really," says Nicole, "and this is how we're trying to survive."
        Christian says he doesn't quite understand why so many people have found inspiration in their story. In his view, he and Nicole are just regular folks going through an ordeal, not too much different from other families with sick children. He's grateful and thankful not just for the donations but for all the messages of support.
        Nicole draws inspiration from them, too. She holds one note especially close, written by a woman who said she had planned to commit suicide until she read about the McDonalds' struggle and found hope in their story.
        Even with the ongoing renovations, their home feels warm and inviting. The message on one living room wall reads "Live, Laugh, Love." On the other, "Peace, Love, Dream." Collages of photographs show the boys from before and after the 27-hour surgery in mid-October.
        The McDonalds gave CNN exclusive access to the surgery and allowed us to follow them in the months since. Their story will be featured in an hour-long special, "Separated: Saving the Twins," hosted by CNN Chief Medical Correspondent Sanjay Gupta on Friday night at 10 ET.
        Much has changed since the surgery. Although it might have been the most difficult medical task, the parents knew what to expect. The doctors essentially gave them a road map of the procedure and the care that would follow. Emotionally, they were prepared.
        But rehab has been different: filled with sick boys, constant worry and extreme ups and downs. While the care has been great, the parents say, there was just no way to be prepared for the various health scares.
        "Every day is a new day with a new challenge," Nicole says. "It has literally been the journey of sickness for the last couple months."
        One night, a feverish Anias suffered a lengthy seizure and stopped breathing when his temperature rose too high, too fast. Two fluid-filled cysts have emerged on the top of his scalp, doubling his head's normal weight. He had to have his skull cap removed due to infection and will undergo another surgery when he is 7 to insert bone.
        Jadon has battled infection, too. Dissolvable plates that were inserted during the surgery have pushed up through his scalp. "I pull out pieces of plate from his head," Nicole says, "and every day, it breaks my heart."
        How do they maintain a semblance of sanity amid the stress?
        "Those little smiling faces when you walk in," says Christian. "They smile so big at you, and they get so excited to see you. ... It's amazing how happy they are.
        "Everything they go through, they're just always smiling and happy. We learn a lot from them."

        Excited boys, ecstatic mom

        Nicole pops into the boys' room at Blythedale. The two are sitting in high chairs in opposite corners. Their faces immediately light up at her presence, and their arms and legs kick excitedly.
        She rushes to Anias first and smothers him in kisses. "Anias, I see you," Nicole shouts.
        She admires his onesie adorned with images of a magnet and a baby chicken. "Chick magnet," it reads.
        "I love your shirt today," Nicole says.
        Across the room, Jadon points to the buckles keeping him locked in his chair, as if to say, "Undo these, please!"
        Nicole rushes to see him, unbuckling his strap and lifting him into her arms. She gives him kisses. He responds with kisses of his own. "Thank you for the kisses," she says. "Now your brother is jealous. We've got to go get him."
        They join Anias in his section of the room. A physical therapist soon enters and takes Jadon away for a 30-minute session. As he's leaving, he blows his mom a kiss and tells her, "Bye."
        This has been their life on the good days: moments of sheer joy and love.
        In addition to physical therapy, the boys receive speech and occupational therapy.
        Jadon has started doing block puzzles and making animal noises. His expressive language is also about that of a 9-month-old. He rolls across the room, lifts his head and sits up by himself. He learns new tasks fast. He can roll a ball while he's sitting, and he can get up on his hands and knees and rock back and forth.
        Anias is still learning what things are. His speech is delayed. He makes sounds like "bah-bah-bah" during speech therapy and is able to say "da-da."
        The physical therapist in Nicole has prepared her well. She works with Anias on getting him to stand and track objects with his eyes. Because he struggles with his right side, she places toys on that side to make him work harder. He'll track the toy and then roll, lift his head and stretch ever so gingerly with his right hand.
        "He's my slow, steady turtle," Nicole says. "Anias is going to do it all. It's just going to take more time."
        Lead neurosurgeon Dr. James Goodrich and lead plastic surgeon Dr. Oren Tepper say they are pleased with how the boys are progressing. The situation is understandably stressful for the parents and the boys, but from a medical standpoint, the twins are doing well.
        In the weeks after the surgery, Goodrich's biggest concerns were bleeding, fluid buildup and infection of tissue surrounding the brain.
        "We've been able to avoid all of that, which is very gratifying," he says. "In rehab, they're actually starting to develop what infants are supposed to do in the sense of being able to sit, stand, hold their heads, and starting to stand with assistance."
        Tepper adds, "I can tell you the trajectory looks very good for both boys right now. (Their infections) have been local with no signs of meningitis, which would be essentially an infection surrounding the brain or something deep. Neither one have had any problems like that."
        Both credit Nicole for getting the boys this far -- a combination of her effusive love and her years as a physical therapist.
        "Nicole's abilities as a parent and skills as a medical professional are really quite unique," says Goodrich. "She has spent every day, pre- and post-surgeries, strengthening Jadon and Anias, in every respect, from physical therapy to wound care management to interaction and play time. She has dedicated herself to helping them thrive."
        Her husband says simply, "She is Superwoman."
        The real work, she says, will begin when she and Christian can bring their boys home. Jadon's wound dressings have to be changed twice a day. Anias eats via a tube every four to six hours. There will be diapers to change, mouths to feed and constant tasks. In between, she'll have to dedicate time to her 3-year-old, Aza.
        Still, she's looking forward to the job.
        Her plan is to work with Jadon and Anias on simple tasks, getting them to repeat each one 20 to 30 times so they can thrive. "Every way that I hold them, every way that I sit them, every way that I position them is in thinking with what's going to improve their condition," Nicole says.
        She says she can tell Anias will have some delays and is eager to work consistently with him. "I can foresee him walking, and I can see him doing all the things he needs to do to function in a community and in his home environment," she says.
        "I just want to get them home so I can practice with them all day long."
        Late last week, Nicole and Christian learned that may soon happen. A doctor at Blythedale told them the subject of Jadon and Anias going home was brought up at the medical team's weekly meeting.
        "I don't want to scare you with this concept," the doctor said, "but what do you think about moving in this direction?"
        Nicole's heart swelled. She says she nearly jumped out of her chair. She's thought about that moment almost all day, every day. The picture is clear in her mind: She and Christian are sitting in their living room, each holding one of the boys, while Aza runs up and hugs them. There's no worry about them being sick or sleeping in a sterile hospital room without their mother.
        "It's just bliss," she says.

        See the latest news and share your comments with CNN Health on Facebook and Twitter.

        She's thought of practical things too, like getting them cribs and preparing their room.
        "We just want to be a family," Christian says.
        The date of their return home has not been set, but the preparation has begun.
        It's the start of making their family whole. A new life, together.

        More From this publisher : HERE

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        Post Source Here: Saving the twins: Health scares and rehab for once-conjoined boys
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        Valhalla, New York (CNN)Nicole McDonald eases her silver minivan across Bear Mountain Bridge and hooks a right onto the steep two-lane highway.

        The road twists like a snake up the mountainous incline, an old route where the road's edge blends into beautiful greenery and perilous cliffs overlook the Hudson River. Where your knuckles turn white from clutching the steering wheel and a knot grows in your belly.
        Nicole makes this trip every day from her home in upstate New York to see her twin sons, Jadon and Anias. The 21-month-old boys are at Blythedale Children's Hospital 40 miles to the south, where they've been undergoing rehabilitation since mid-December. The twins, born joined at the head, captured the world's attention after a marathon surgery to separate them last fall.
          The journey to go see them, Nicole says, is similar to the one her boys have been through: setbacks and victories, nerve-wracking and awe-inspiring.
          "It's like climbing a mountain," she says, "and you get to the place you thought was the top only to realize you have another mile to go and you don't have the supplies for it."
          She thinks back to a moment weeks earlier when she reached a breaking point. Jadon and Anias had been sick off and on for nearly a month. Her other child, 3-year-old Aza, battled high fevers and croup. Amid it all, Mom got sick.
          But after a few days, finally, it seemed everyone was healthy. Nicole visited the boys at the rehabilitation center. Jadon fell asleep in his crib, and she worked to put Anias down. He was laughing, but in an instant, he unleashed a scream and vomited. Again and again, until nothing was left.
          Nicole stood, drenched in vomit, and held her 25-pound boy for more than six hours. Then, Jadon awoke, "just puking nonstop." She wondered why, after everything her boys have gone through, they couldn't seem to catch a break.
          In that moment, she closed her eyes. "I quit," she thought. "I can't do this anymore."

            A 360 look inside the operating room during the boys' surgery

          Seconds later, though, she snapped back. Amid the desperate exhaustion, she found strength. She became more focused, more determined, more resilient. Her boys needed her. Her family needed her.
          She didn't sleep for two days, tending to their every need.
          A physical therapist by training, she learned that she could rely on her instincts -- and that no matter what was thrown at her, she was strong enough to take it.
          "My 'I quit' moment shoved me into the mindset of 'I can do this,' " she says. "Not only can I handle it, I can handle it on my own. It was about being free, even though it's hard."
          She took that moment almost like a rallying cry for her boys. And she found it both exhilarating and rewarding: "I can be their mom without some nurse coming in every two seconds. Eventually, I'm going to have to do this at home. It was proof for me in that 'I quit' moment that I can."
          What drives her is the sheer joy that spreads across her boys' faces when she enters their room. Most of all, she just wants to bring them home.
          She mashes the accelerator on the road to see her boys.

          'Just trying to survive'

          Christian McDonald climbs the extension ladder and rips rotted wall studs from the outside of the family's split-level ranch house. His shirt is peeled off, and sweat drips from his chin.
          While Nicole works with the boys, Christian works to ready their newly purchased home for the twins' return. The work has allowed the former truck driver to return to his blue-collar roots. Knocking down walls and ripping up siding has been good for his soul, a way to relieve the stress of dealing with everything Jadon and Anias have gone through.
          The wood-shingled house, nestled in Orange County with views of the Catskill Mountains, is the family's third home in less than two years.
          In February 2016, they transported their lives from small-town Illinois to the Bronx to be near the Children's Hospital at Montefiore Medical Center, where the twins' surgery took place. They lived in a rental home for more than a year.
          Once the twins were moved to rehab at Blythedale, in Valhalla, the family moved too -- in part to get away from the hectic pace of the city.
          The house, which had been a foreclosure, is in need of what a real estate agent might call "a little TLC." The stairs leading up to the front door have been demolished -- one of many projects on Christian's to-do list. He's refinished one bathroom, turning it into showroom quality.
          Nicole and Christian hope to flip the home eventually; they say they wouldn't have been able to afford it if not for strangers who donated more than $330,000on their GoFundMe page. Neither parent has been able to work since their journey to New York began.
          "We're just trying to survive, really," says Nicole, "and this is how we're trying to survive."
          Christian says he doesn't quite understand why so many people have found inspiration in their story. In his view, he and Nicole are just regular folks going through an ordeal, not too much different from other families with sick children. He's grateful and thankful not just for the donations but for all the messages of support.
          Nicole draws inspiration from them, too. She holds one note especially close, written by a woman who said she had planned to commit suicide until she read about the McDonalds' struggle and found hope in their story.
          Even with the ongoing renovations, their home feels warm and inviting. The message on one living room wall reads "Live, Laugh, Love." On the other, "Peace, Love, Dream." Collages of photographs show the boys from before and after the 27-hour surgery in mid-October.
          The McDonalds gave CNN exclusive access to the surgery and allowed us to follow them in the months since. Their story will be featured in an hour-long special, "Separated: Saving the Twins," hosted by CNN Chief Medical Correspondent Sanjay Gupta on Friday night at 10 ET.
          Much has changed since the surgery. Although it might have been the most difficult medical task, the parents knew what to expect. The doctors essentially gave them a road map of the procedure and the care that would follow. Emotionally, they were prepared.
          But rehab has been different: filled with sick boys, constant worry and extreme ups and downs. While the care has been great, the parents say, there was just no way to be prepared for the various health scares.
          "Every day is a new day with a new challenge," Nicole says. "It has literally been the journey of sickness for the last couple months."
          One night, a feverish Anias suffered a lengthy seizure and stopped breathing when his temperature rose too high, too fast. Two fluid-filled cysts have emerged on the top of his scalp, doubling his head's normal weight. He had to have his skull cap removed due to infection and will undergo another surgery when he is 7 to insert bone.
          Jadon has battled infection, too. Dissolvable plates that were inserted during the surgery have pushed up through his scalp. "I pull out pieces of plate from his head," Nicole says, "and every day, it breaks my heart."
          How do they maintain a semblance of sanity amid the stress?
          "Those little smiling faces when you walk in," says Christian. "They smile so big at you, and they get so excited to see you. ... It's amazing how happy they are.
          "Everything they go through, they're just always smiling and happy. We learn a lot from them."

          Excited boys, ecstatic mom

          Nicole pops into the boys' room at Blythedale. The two are sitting in high chairs in opposite corners. Their faces immediately light up at her presence, and their arms and legs kick excitedly.
          She rushes to Anias first and smothers him in kisses. "Anias, I see you," Nicole shouts.
          She admires his onesie adorned with images of a magnet and a baby chicken. "Chick magnet," it reads.
          "I love your shirt today," Nicole says.
          Across the room, Jadon points to the buckles keeping him locked in his chair, as if to say, "Undo these, please!"
          Nicole rushes to see him, unbuckling his strap and lifting him into her arms. She gives him kisses. He responds with kisses of his own. "Thank you for the kisses," she says. "Now your brother is jealous. We've got to go get him."
          They join Anias in his section of the room. A physical therapist soon enters and takes Jadon away for a 30-minute session. As he's leaving, he blows his mom a kiss and tells her, "Bye."
          This has been their life on the good days: moments of sheer joy and love.
          In addition to physical therapy, the boys receive speech and occupational therapy.
          Jadon has started doing block puzzles and making animal noises. His expressive language is also about that of a 9-month-old. He rolls across the room, lifts his head and sits up by himself. He learns new tasks fast. He can roll a ball while he's sitting, and he can get up on his hands and knees and rock back and forth.
          Anias is still learning what things are. His speech is delayed. He makes sounds like "bah-bah-bah" during speech therapy and is able to say "da-da."
          The physical therapist in Nicole has prepared her well. She works with Anias on getting him to stand and track objects with his eyes. Because he struggles with his right side, she places toys on that side to make him work harder. He'll track the toy and then roll, lift his head and stretch ever so gingerly with his right hand.
          "He's my slow, steady turtle," Nicole says. "Anias is going to do it all. It's just going to take more time."
          Lead neurosurgeon Dr. James Goodrich and lead plastic surgeon Dr. Oren Tepper say they are pleased with how the boys are progressing. The situation is understandably stressful for the parents and the boys, but from a medical standpoint, the twins are doing well.
          In the weeks after the surgery, Goodrich's biggest concerns were bleeding, fluid buildup and infection of tissue surrounding the brain.
          "We've been able to avoid all of that, which is very gratifying," he says. "In rehab, they're actually starting to develop what infants are supposed to do in the sense of being able to sit, stand, hold their heads, and starting to stand with assistance."
          Tepper adds, "I can tell you the trajectory looks very good for both boys right now. (Their infections) have been local with no signs of meningitis, which would be essentially an infection surrounding the brain or something deep. Neither one have had any problems like that."
          Both credit Nicole for getting the boys this far -- a combination of her effusive love and her years as a physical therapist.
          "Nicole's abilities as a parent and skills as a medical professional are really quite unique," says Goodrich. "She has spent every day, pre- and post-surgeries, strengthening Jadon and Anias, in every respect, from physical therapy to wound care management to interaction and play time. She has dedicated herself to helping them thrive."
          Her husband says simply, "She is Superwoman."
          The real work, she says, will begin when she and Christian can bring their boys home. Jadon's wound dressings have to be changed twice a day. Anias eats via a tube every four to six hours. There will be diapers to change, mouths to feed and constant tasks. In between, she'll have to dedicate time to her 3-year-old, Aza.
          Still, she's looking forward to the job.
          Her plan is to work with Jadon and Anias on simple tasks, getting them to repeat each one 20 to 30 times so they can thrive. "Every way that I hold them, every way that I sit them, every way that I position them is in thinking with what's going to improve their condition," Nicole says.
          She says she can tell Anias will have some delays and is eager to work consistently with him. "I can foresee him walking, and I can see him doing all the things he needs to do to function in a community and in his home environment," she says.
          "I just want to get them home so I can practice with them all day long."
          Late last week, Nicole and Christian learned that may soon happen. A doctor at Blythedale told them the subject of Jadon and Anias going home was brought up at the medical team's weekly meeting.
          "I don't want to scare you with this concept," the doctor said, "but what do you think about moving in this direction?"
          Nicole's heart swelled. She says she nearly jumped out of her chair. She's thought about that moment almost all day, every day. The picture is clear in her mind: She and Christian are sitting in their living room, each holding one of the boys, while Aza runs up and hugs them. There's no worry about them being sick or sleeping in a sterile hospital room without their mother.
          "It's just bliss," she says.

          See the latest news and share your comments with CNN Health on Facebook and Twitter.

          She's thought of practical things too, like getting them cribs and preparing their room.
          "We just want to be a family," Christian says.
          The date of their return home has not been set, but the preparation has begun.
          It's the start of making their family whole. A new life, together.

          More From this publisher : HERE

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          Sen. Bernie Sanders: ‘Democratic brand is pretty bad’http://dietandweightloss.tips4all.eu/sen-bernie-sanders-democratic-brand-is-pretty-bad/ Fri, 23 Jun 2017 08:02:51 +0000 http://dietandweightloss.tips4all.eu/?p=2840

          (CNN)Sen. Bernie Sanders said Thursday he agreed with Democratic congressman Tim Ryan's claim that the Democratic brand is worse than President Donald Trump's in some parts of the country.

          "I speak as the longest serving independent in American congressional history, the Democratic brand is pretty bad," Sanders told CNN's Anderson Cooper on "AC360."
          "I think the Trump brand is also pretty bad as is the Republican brand. That's why so many people are giving up on politics."
            Following the Democrat Jon Ossoff's defeat in a Georgia special House election, some Democratic lawmakers have voiced their concerns about the party's future.
            The Vermont senator argued that the recent special elections need to be put in context.
            "The context is all of them are Republican seats and Trump did, in most of those seats, did very, very well." Sanders continued, "Democrats did much better than was the case in the last election."

              Sanders: GOP health care bill is barbaric

            The former Democratic presidential candidate added that the Democrats have the momentum, but the party has to do some "internal soul searching."
            "Understand that for the last 10 years, the model that they have had really has not worked," Sanders said. "It doesn't work when you lose the US Senate, US House, the White House. When almost two-thirds of governors chairs are controlled by Republicans. When Democrats have lost a thousand seats and legislatures all over the country."
            Sanders told Cooper what he believes the Democrats have to do to win back voters.
            Democrats need to "make it clear to working people of this country that the Democratic Party is on their side," Sanders exclaimed. "The Democrats need a progressive agenda. They need to rebuild the party in states they have ignored for decades, where they have almost no presence right now and create a 50-state party."

            More From this publisher : HERE

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            (CNN)Sen. Bernie Sanders said Thursday he agreed with Democratic congressman Tim Ryan's claim that the Democratic brand is worse than President Donald Trump's in some parts of the country.

            "I speak as the longest serving independent in American congressional history, the Democratic brand is pretty bad," Sanders told CNN's Anderson Cooper on "AC360."
            "I think the Trump brand is also pretty bad as is the Republican brand. That's why so many people are giving up on politics."
              Following the Democrat Jon Ossoff's defeat in a Georgia special House election, some Democratic lawmakers have voiced their concerns about the party's future.
              The Vermont senator argued that the recent special elections need to be put in context.
              "The context is all of them are Republican seats and Trump did, in most of those seats, did very, very well." Sanders continued, "Democrats did much better than was the case in the last election."

                Sanders: GOP health care bill is barbaric

              The former Democratic presidential candidate added that the Democrats have the momentum, but the party has to do some "internal soul searching."
              "Understand that for the last 10 years, the model that they have had really has not worked," Sanders said. "It doesn't work when you lose the US Senate, US House, the White House. When almost two-thirds of governors chairs are controlled by Republicans. When Democrats have lost a thousand seats and legislatures all over the country."
              Sanders told Cooper what he believes the Democrats have to do to win back voters.
              Democrats need to "make it clear to working people of this country that the Democratic Party is on their side," Sanders exclaimed. "The Democrats need a progressive agenda. They need to rebuild the party in states they have ignored for decades, where they have almost no presence right now and create a 50-state party."

              More From this publisher : HERE

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              2840
              Social media pressure is linked to cosmetic procedure boom – BBC Newshttp://dietandweightloss.tips4all.eu/social-media-pressure-is-linked-to-cosmetic-procedure-boom-bbc-news/ Fri, 23 Jun 2017 02:59:57 +0000 http://dietandweightloss.tips4all.eu/?p=2837
              Image copyright Science Photo Library

              Young people are turning to cosmetic procedures such as botox and dermal fillers as a result of social media pressure, according to a report.

              A study by the Nuffield Council on Bioethics says government must protect people from an unregulated industry.

              The report also condemns makeover apps and online plastic surgery games aimed at children as young as nine.

              The authors fear such apps are contributing to growing anxieties around body image.

              Much of the cosmetic procedures industry is unregulated so reliable data on its size is hard to come by.

              In 2015 one market research company estimated the UK market could be worth as much as 3.6bn.

              But there is little doubt it has grown significantly over the past decade.

              Focus on body image

              The report identifies several factors that are encouraging young people in particular to focus on body image.

              These include increasing levels of anxiety around appearance, the rise of social media where photos can receive positive or negative ratings and the popularity of celebrity culture, complete with airbrushed images and apparently perfect lifestyles.

              Image caption Prof Jeanette Edwards says the panel was shocked to discover palstic surgery apps aimed at young girls

              Prof Jeanette Edwards, from the University of Manchester, who chaired the council's inquiry into ethical issues surrounding cosmetic procedures, said some of the evidence around games aimed at younger children had surprised the panel.

              "We've been shocked by some of the evidence we've seen, including make-over apps and cosmetic surgery 'games' that target girls as young as nine.

              "There is a daily bombardment from advertising and through social media channels like Facebook, Instagram and Snapchat that relentlessly promote unrealistic and often discriminatory messages on how people, especially girls and women, 'should' look."

              Plastic surgery Apps

              The report describes how apps with names such as "Plastic Surgery Princess", "Little Skin Doctor" and "Pimp My Face" could be contributing to mental health problems in young people.

              Media playback is unsupported on your device

              Media captionDeclan Green: 'You want to show everything you're doing 24/7'

              Prof Edwards also called for cosmetic procedures to be banned for anyone under 18 unless they involve a multi-disciplinary team of specialists, GPs and psychologists.

              "Under 18s should not be able to just walk in off the street and have a cosmetic procedure.

              "There are legal age limits for having tattoos or using sun beds. Invasive cosmetic procedures should be regulated in a similar way."

              'Immense pressure on the young'

              Charlie Massey, chief executive of the General Medical Council, which regulates doctors, said that it had already introduced standards for those performing cosmetic procedures to ensure they work safely and ethically and was developing similar guidelines for surgeons.

              "Cosmetic interventions are not without risk, and anyone considering a procedure must have confidence that those carrying it out have the necessary skills and competence to do so safely.

              "We hope this certification system will, in time, help set the standard for similar forms of accreditation in different areas of practice, that will provide additional reassurance to patients."

              A government spokesperson also said action had been taken to improve regulation.

              But they added: "This report highlights once again that we live in a world where young people are under immense pressure on a daily basis about how they should look - it is ethically wrong for companies to exploit this and offer unnecessary cosmetic procedures to under 18s."

              Kevin Hancock, of the British Association of Aesthetic Plastic Surgeons, said the report "voices may of the same concerns" his organisation has.

              More From this publisher : HERE

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              Image copyright Science Photo Library

              Young people are turning to cosmetic procedures such as botox and dermal fillers as a result of social media pressure, according to a report.

              A study by the Nuffield Council on Bioethics says government must protect people from an unregulated industry.

              The report also condemns makeover apps and online plastic surgery games aimed at children as young as nine.

              The authors fear such apps are contributing to growing anxieties around body image.

              Much of the cosmetic procedures industry is unregulated so reliable data on its size is hard to come by.

              In 2015 one market research company estimated the UK market could be worth as much as 3.6bn.

              But there is little doubt it has grown significantly over the past decade.

              Focus on body image

              The report identifies several factors that are encouraging young people in particular to focus on body image.

              These include increasing levels of anxiety around appearance, the rise of social media where photos can receive positive or negative ratings and the popularity of celebrity culture, complete with airbrushed images and apparently perfect lifestyles.

              Image caption Prof Jeanette Edwards says the panel was shocked to discover palstic surgery apps aimed at young girls

              Prof Jeanette Edwards, from the University of Manchester, who chaired the council's inquiry into ethical issues surrounding cosmetic procedures, said some of the evidence around games aimed at younger children had surprised the panel.

              "We've been shocked by some of the evidence we've seen, including make-over apps and cosmetic surgery 'games' that target girls as young as nine.

              "There is a daily bombardment from advertising and through social media channels like Facebook, Instagram and Snapchat that relentlessly promote unrealistic and often discriminatory messages on how people, especially girls and women, 'should' look."

              Plastic surgery Apps

              The report describes how apps with names such as "Plastic Surgery Princess", "Little Skin Doctor" and "Pimp My Face" could be contributing to mental health problems in young people.

              Media playback is unsupported on your device

              Media captionDeclan Green: 'You want to show everything you're doing 24/7'

              Prof Edwards also called for cosmetic procedures to be banned for anyone under 18 unless they involve a multi-disciplinary team of specialists, GPs and psychologists.

              "Under 18s should not be able to just walk in off the street and have a cosmetic procedure.

              "There are legal age limits for having tattoos or using sun beds. Invasive cosmetic procedures should be regulated in a similar way."

              'Immense pressure on the young'

              Charlie Massey, chief executive of the General Medical Council, which regulates doctors, said that it had already introduced standards for those performing cosmetic procedures to ensure they work safely and ethically and was developing similar guidelines for surgeons.

              "Cosmetic interventions are not without risk, and anyone considering a procedure must have confidence that those carrying it out have the necessary skills and competence to do so safely.

              "We hope this certification system will, in time, help set the standard for similar forms of accreditation in different areas of practice, that will provide additional reassurance to patients."

              A government spokesperson also said action had been taken to improve regulation.

              But they added: "This report highlights once again that we live in a world where young people are under immense pressure on a daily basis about how they should look - it is ethically wrong for companies to exploit this and offer unnecessary cosmetic procedures to under 18s."

              Kevin Hancock, of the British Association of Aesthetic Plastic Surgeons, said the report "voices may of the same concerns" his organisation has.

              More From this publisher : HERE

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              2837
              Trump Blames Democrats For Obstructing Health Care Bill They Haven’t Seen Yethttp://dietandweightloss.tips4all.eu/trump-blames-democrats-for-obstructing-health-care-bill-they-havent-seen-yet/ Thu, 22 Jun 2017 23:59:43 +0000 http://dietandweightloss.tips4all.eu/?p=2834

              President Donald Trump again blamed Senate Democrats for blocking the passage of a health care bill that no one outside of a handful of GOP lawmakers has actually seen yet.

              Speaking Wednesday at a rally in Cedar Rapids, Iowa, Trump lamented criticism that his administration hasnt accomplished much yet and pointed a finger at Democratic lawmakers for slowing the passage of a bill to repeal and replace the Affordable Care Act.

              If we went and got the single greatest health care plan in the history of the world, we would not get one Democrat vote, because theyre obstructionists, Trump claimed. If we came to you and said, Heres your plan, youre going to have the greatest plan in history, and youre going to pay nothing, theyd vote against it, folks.

              Trump tweeted similar complaintsearlier Wednesday.

              If we had even a little Democrat support, just a little, like a couple of votes, youd have everything. And you could give us a lot of votes and wed even be willing to change it and move it around and try and make it even better, he continued at the Iowa rally. But again,They just want to stop, they just want to obstruct. A few votes from the Democrats, seriously, a few votes from the Democrats, it could be so easy, so beautiful, and youd have cooperation.

              What Trump failed to mention is that Senate Democrats havent actually had the opportunity to even read the bill, which Republican senators have written almost entirely behind closed doors. The unprecedented lack of transparencyhas drawn outrage from Democrats, the media and the public, while Republicans have falsely claimed that Democrats engaged in similar secrecy while writing the Affordable Care Act in 2009 and 2010.(Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.) said he plans to release the text of the bill Thursday.)

              Trump, who described the House version of the bill as mean, said Wednesday that he hopes Republicans will surprise the public with a plan with heart.

              Reports, however, indicate that the Senate bill will be substantially similar to the one passed in the House last month. An estimated 23 million fewer people would have health care coverage under that bill, according to a Congressional Budget Office analysis of it.

              And as HuffPosts Jeffrey Young points out, the bills intent, regardless of what the Senate version looks like, is already clear. The purpose of this bill is to dramatically scale back the safety netso wealthy people and health care companies can get a massive tax cut, Young wrote this week.

              The president also mocked Democrats for failing to pick up seats in special elections in Georgia and South Carolina on Tuesday, singling out Jon Ossoff, the Democrat who narrowly lost in Georgias 6th Congressional District.

              They thought they were going to win last night in Atlanta, he said. And theyve been unbelievably nasty, really nasty. They spent close to $30 million on this kid, who forgot to live in the community he was in.

              Trump then acknowledged that his criticism may not be doing Senate Republicans any favors in winning over their Democratic colleagues.

              I am making it a little bit hard to get their support, but who cares? he said.

              More From this publisher : HERE

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              President Donald Trump again blamed Senate Democrats for blocking the passage of a health care bill that no one outside of a handful of GOP lawmakers has actually seen yet.

              Speaking Wednesday at a rally in Cedar Rapids, Iowa, Trump lamented criticism that his administration hasnt accomplished much yet and pointed a finger at Democratic lawmakers for slowing the passage of a bill to repeal and replace the Affordable Care Act.

              If we went and got the single greatest health care plan in the history of the world, we would not get one Democrat vote, because theyre obstructionists, Trump claimed. If we came to you and said, Heres your plan, youre going to have the greatest plan in history, and youre going to pay nothing, theyd vote against it, folks.

              Trump tweeted similar complaintsearlier Wednesday.

              If we had even a little Democrat support, just a little, like a couple of votes, youd have everything. And you could give us a lot of votes and wed even be willing to change it and move it around and try and make it even better, he continued at the Iowa rally. But again,They just want to stop, they just want to obstruct. A few votes from the Democrats, seriously, a few votes from the Democrats, it could be so easy, so beautiful, and youd have cooperation.

              What Trump failed to mention is that Senate Democrats havent actually had the opportunity to even read the bill, which Republican senators have written almost entirely behind closed doors. The unprecedented lack of transparencyhas drawn outrage from Democrats, the media and the public, while Republicans have falsely claimed that Democrats engaged in similar secrecy while writing the Affordable Care Act in 2009 and 2010.(Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.) said he plans to release the text of the bill Thursday.)

              Trump, who described the House version of the bill as mean, said Wednesday that he hopes Republicans will surprise the public with a plan with heart.

              Reports, however, indicate that the Senate bill will be substantially similar to the one passed in the House last month. An estimated 23 million fewer people would have health care coverage under that bill, according to a Congressional Budget Office analysis of it.

              And as HuffPosts Jeffrey Young points out, the bills intent, regardless of what the Senate version looks like, is already clear. The purpose of this bill is to dramatically scale back the safety netso wealthy people and health care companies can get a massive tax cut, Young wrote this week.

              The president also mocked Democrats for failing to pick up seats in special elections in Georgia and South Carolina on Tuesday, singling out Jon Ossoff, the Democrat who narrowly lost in Georgias 6th Congressional District.

              They thought they were going to win last night in Atlanta, he said. And theyve been unbelievably nasty, really nasty. They spent close to $30 million on this kid, who forgot to live in the community he was in.

              Trump then acknowledged that his criticism may not be doing Senate Republicans any favors in winning over their Democratic colleagues.

              I am making it a little bit hard to get their support, but who cares? he said.

              More From this publisher : HERE

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              2834