Diet & Weight Loss - Feed https://dietandweightloss.tips4all.eu health , news , tips & tricks Mon, 24 Sep 2018 09:25:02 +0000 en-US https://wordpress.org/?v=4.9.8 https://dietandweightloss.tips4all.eu/wp-content/uploads/2018/06/cropped-ama-news-logo-32x32.pngDiet & Weight Loss – health , news , tips & trickshttps://dietandweightloss.tips4all.eu 32 32 76137576 Paul Ryan on Trump tweets: ‘Justice should be blind’https://dietandweightloss.tips4all.eu/paul-ryan-on-trump-tweets-justice-should-be-blind/ Mon, 24 Sep 2018 09:21:46 +0000 https://dietandweightloss.tips4all.eu/?p=3342 California

(CNN)House Speaker Paul Ryan, responding to a question about President Donald Trump's latest attacks on the Department of Justice, insisted Wednesday that "the process is working its way as it should" after two Republican members of Congress were indicted last month.

Asked Wednesday if Ryan was comfortable with Trump's attacks against the department, Ryan argued that "justice is blind."
campaign finance violations
"Justice is blind, justice should be blind. It should have no respect with respect to political party. Look, I mean, that's the emblem of the Justice Department: blind justice," he said. "So I think it's very important that we respect the fact that justice should be blind. It should have no impact on political party, and I think the process is working its way as it should."
    Trump on Monday accused the Justice Department of targeting the Republicans ahead of the midterms.
    "Two long running, Obama era, investigations of two very popular Republican Congressmen were brought to a well publicized charge, just ahead of the Mid-Terms, by the Jeff Sessions Justice Department. Two easy wins now in doubt because there is not enough time. Good job Jeff......"
    Trump was referring to the unrelated indictments of Rep. Duncan Hunter of California and Rep. Chris Collins of New York, two of Trump's earliest supporters in Congress.
    Collins was charged with 13 counts of securities fraud, wire fraud and making false statements related to an alleged insider trading scheme. Hunter was indicted for using campaign funds for personal use and were charged with counts of wire fraud, falsifying records, campaign finance violations and conspiracy.
    Both lawmakers have pleaded not guilty.
    Despite the President's claim that both cases were "Obama era" investigations, the probe involving Collins began under Trump, from actions the New York Republican allegedly took last year -- including calls he placed while at the White House for a congressional picnic hosted by Trump.
    Allegations against Hunter began in 2016 -- when Obama was still president -- but the Justice Department began investigating Hunter last year. The House Ethics Committee announced in March 2017 that it was holding off on taking action against Hunter because the Justice Department had launched a criminal investigation into his use of campaign funds.
    Ryan reiterated that both men have been stripped of their committee assignments.
    "These are isolated incidents, and our members are working hard at doing their jobs ... to improve people's lives," Ryan said.

    Original Article : HERE ; This post was curated & posted using : RealSpecific

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    California

    (CNN)House Speaker Paul Ryan, responding to a question about President Donald Trump's latest attacks on the Department of Justice, insisted Wednesday that "the process is working its way as it should" after two Republican members of Congress were indicted last month.

    Asked Wednesday if Ryan was comfortable with Trump's attacks against the department, Ryan argued that "justice is blind."
    campaign finance violations
    "Justice is blind, justice should be blind. It should have no respect with respect to political party. Look, I mean, that's the emblem of the Justice Department: blind justice," he said. "So I think it's very important that we respect the fact that justice should be blind. It should have no impact on political party, and I think the process is working its way as it should."
      Trump on Monday accused the Justice Department of targeting the Republicans ahead of the midterms.
      "Two long running, Obama era, investigations of two very popular Republican Congressmen were brought to a well publicized charge, just ahead of the Mid-Terms, by the Jeff Sessions Justice Department. Two easy wins now in doubt because there is not enough time. Good job Jeff......"
      Trump was referring to the unrelated indictments of Rep. Duncan Hunter of California and Rep. Chris Collins of New York, two of Trump's earliest supporters in Congress.
      Collins was charged with 13 counts of securities fraud, wire fraud and making false statements related to an alleged insider trading scheme. Hunter was indicted for using campaign funds for personal use and were charged with counts of wire fraud, falsifying records, campaign finance violations and conspiracy.
      Both lawmakers have pleaded not guilty.
      Despite the President's claim that both cases were "Obama era" investigations, the probe involving Collins began under Trump, from actions the New York Republican allegedly took last year -- including calls he placed while at the White House for a congressional picnic hosted by Trump.
      Allegations against Hunter began in 2016 -- when Obama was still president -- but the Justice Department began investigating Hunter last year. The House Ethics Committee announced in March 2017 that it was holding off on taking action against Hunter because the Justice Department had launched a criminal investigation into his use of campaign funds.
      Ryan reiterated that both men have been stripped of their committee assignments.
      "These are isolated incidents, and our members are working hard at doing their jobs ... to improve people's lives," Ryan said.

      Original Article : HERE ; This post was curated & posted using : RealSpecific

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      3342
      How Big Can a Solar-Powered Drone Be?https://dietandweightloss.tips4all.eu/how-big-can-a-solar-powered-drone-be/ Mon, 24 Sep 2018 04:48:30 +0000 https://dietandweightloss.tips4all.eu/?p=3339

      It's a brilliant idea: Put solar panels on a drone so it doesn't need a battery. Without a battery, you could fly a drone as long as the sun keeps shining. It's awesome (assuming your motives are pure). That's exactly what students at the National University of Singapore did.

      But if you watch the video, you'll notice right away that the drone is as thin as a sheet. The real question then, is what size and mass could this vehicle be and still run completely on solar power? I'm going to answer the question and give you a solar-powered quadcopter calculator. But first, let's look at the physics and ideas that factor into this equation.

      Solar Power

      Power is defined as the time rate of energy usage (change in energy divided by change in time) and is measured in units of watts.

      Ideally, you want all the power from the solar panels to be devoted to flying. This means there is no need for a battery to temporarily store energy—which is fine, since that would add mass. But how much power can you get from a solar panel? That is the real issue.

      The power output from a solar panel depends on the following values (with some initial estimates from me):

      • The Sun, or rather the power from the Sun. The power per area of the energy from the Sun at the surface of Earth is about 1000 watts per square meter. You can't really change this value unless you change the Sun (not recommended). (Represented by E)
      • The size of the solar panel. Bigger panels suck up more power. Let start off with about 0.04 square meters. (A is for area)
      • The efficiency of the solar panel. Just because you get 1000 W/m2 hitting the solar panel doesn't mean all of that goes into electricity. An efficiency of 28 percent seems plausible. (Efficiency = e)
      • Orientation angle. If the sunlight is perpendicular to the solar panel, that's best. Of course the Sun is probably not directly overhead. What about an incident angle of θ = 45°?

      With that, I get the power output as the following equation:

      That's it for the solar power.

      Hovering Power

      The power needed for a hovering quadcopter is a little more complicated. Nevertheless, this will work for any flying vehicle that hovers by pushing air down.

      Let's start with the nature of forces and motion. If you take an object that is at rest and increase its speed, this requires a force. The magnitude of this pushing force depends on the mass of the object, the change in speed, and the time over which the speed changes. Now replace this object with air—because that's what these flying vehicles use to fly. You can get a greater thrust force by using more mass of air using a larger rotor area. You can also get more thrust by increasing the speed of the air.

      There is some more math involved here, but I am going to skip it; (you could look over this if you want). But wait! We don't care about the thrust force, we want the power. If you increase the speed of air (with mass), this increases its kinetic energy. The faster you increase the kinetic energy, the more power it takes.

      This means that you could have a hovering craft with small rotors that pushes the air down really fast OR a large rotor that pushes the air down at a slower speed. But the power isn't the same for these two options. Since the kinetic energy is proportional to the square of the velocity, the smaller rotor with faster air requires MUCH more power to hover. Incidentally, this is why a human-powered helicopter (a real thing) has to be so large, to get the power down to human levels.

      Calculating Hovering Power

      Now for all the details. How big is this quadcopter? How large are the rotors? What about the size of the solar panels? What if someone invents a more efficient solar panel? Instead of calculating all possible variations, I am just going to make a calculator of sorts. Really, this is just a Python program that calculates the the rotor size needed to hover for a given set of parameters. Also note that this is just one more reason that Python is a better calculator than your standard scientific calculator. (Plus, Python is free.)

      Here is the code—right here in this page. Feel free to edit the values and rerun the calculation. Don't worry, you can't break anything. It's unbreakable code. Just click the "play" to run and the "pencil" to edit.

      With my default estimations, I get a rotor diameter of almost 5.9 centimeters. That seems fairly reasonable. But what if you increase the mass? What about the size of the solar panels? Yes, now you can change these things with just a few edits of the code. You are all set to make your own solar-powered drone.


      More Great WIRED Stories

      Original Article : HERE ; This post was curated & posted using : RealSpecific

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      Learn More Here: How Big Can a Solar-Powered Drone Be?
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      ]]>

      It's a brilliant idea: Put solar panels on a drone so it doesn't need a battery. Without a battery, you could fly a drone as long as the sun keeps shining. It's awesome (assuming your motives are pure). That's exactly what students at the National University of Singapore did.

      But if you watch the video, you'll notice right away that the drone is as thin as a sheet. The real question then, is what size and mass could this vehicle be and still run completely on solar power? I'm going to answer the question and give you a solar-powered quadcopter calculator. But first, let's look at the physics and ideas that factor into this equation.

      Solar Power

      Power is defined as the time rate of energy usage (change in energy divided by change in time) and is measured in units of watts.

      Ideally, you want all the power from the solar panels to be devoted to flying. This means there is no need for a battery to temporarily store energy—which is fine, since that would add mass. But how much power can you get from a solar panel? That is the real issue.

      The power output from a solar panel depends on the following values (with some initial estimates from me):

      • The Sun, or rather the power from the Sun. The power per area of the energy from the Sun at the surface of Earth is about 1000 watts per square meter. You can't really change this value unless you change the Sun (not recommended). (Represented by E)
      • The size of the solar panel. Bigger panels suck up more power. Let start off with about 0.04 square meters. (A is for area)
      • The efficiency of the solar panel. Just because you get 1000 W/m2 hitting the solar panel doesn't mean all of that goes into electricity. An efficiency of 28 percent seems plausible. (Efficiency = e)
      • Orientation angle. If the sunlight is perpendicular to the solar panel, that's best. Of course the Sun is probably not directly overhead. What about an incident angle of θ = 45°?

      With that, I get the power output as the following equation:

      That's it for the solar power.

      Hovering Power

      The power needed for a hovering quadcopter is a little more complicated. Nevertheless, this will work for any flying vehicle that hovers by pushing air down.

      Let's start with the nature of forces and motion. If you take an object that is at rest and increase its speed, this requires a force. The magnitude of this pushing force depends on the mass of the object, the change in speed, and the time over which the speed changes. Now replace this object with air—because that's what these flying vehicles use to fly. You can get a greater thrust force by using more mass of air using a larger rotor area. You can also get more thrust by increasing the speed of the air.

      There is some more math involved here, but I am going to skip it; (you could look over this if you want). But wait! We don't care about the thrust force, we want the power. If you increase the speed of air (with mass), this increases its kinetic energy. The faster you increase the kinetic energy, the more power it takes.

      This means that you could have a hovering craft with small rotors that pushes the air down really fast OR a large rotor that pushes the air down at a slower speed. But the power isn't the same for these two options. Since the kinetic energy is proportional to the square of the velocity, the smaller rotor with faster air requires MUCH more power to hover. Incidentally, this is why a human-powered helicopter (a real thing) has to be so large, to get the power down to human levels.

      Calculating Hovering Power

      Now for all the details. How big is this quadcopter? How large are the rotors? What about the size of the solar panels? What if someone invents a more efficient solar panel? Instead of calculating all possible variations, I am just going to make a calculator of sorts. Really, this is just a Python program that calculates the the rotor size needed to hover for a given set of parameters. Also note that this is just one more reason that Python is a better calculator than your standard scientific calculator. (Plus, Python is free.)

      Here is the code—right here in this page. Feel free to edit the values and rerun the calculation. Don't worry, you can't break anything. It's unbreakable code. Just click the "play" to run and the "pencil" to edit.

      With my default estimations, I get a rotor diameter of almost 5.9 centimeters. That seems fairly reasonable. But what if you increase the mass? What about the size of the solar panels? Yes, now you can change these things with just a few edits of the code. You are all set to make your own solar-powered drone.


      More Great WIRED Stories

      Original Article : HERE ; This post was curated & posted using : RealSpecific

      =>
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      Learn More Here: How Big Can a Solar-Powered Drone Be?
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      ]]>
      3339
      What’s streaming on Hulu this Octoberhttps://dietandweightloss.tips4all.eu/whats-streaming-on-hulu-this-october/ Sun, 23 Sep 2018 22:51:41 +0000 https://dietandweightloss.tips4all.eu/?p=3335 Alaine Ducasse

      Image: Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer Studios

      Buckle up, ghost friends! With October just days away, the aptly named "Huluween" is right around the corner.

      From charmingly creepy picks like The Nightmare Before Christmas to hair-raising horrors like The Others, Hulu's Halloween selection has a little something for everyone. 

      But, even if you're not looking to get into the spooky festivities (scaredy cat!), there's plenty to choose from—including the original RoboCop trilogy and the criminally underrated Hot Tub Time Machine.

      Plan your October fright fest with the complete list of everything coming to and going from Hulu this October below.

      Top Pick: American Psycho (2000)

      Ah, American Psycho: the Christian Bale film that gave me yet another reason to not date creepy Wall Street dudes. 

      Based on Bret Easton Ellis's novel of the same name, this horror flick chronicles the "antics" of Patrick Bateman—a wealthy investment banker with passions for skin care, pop rock, and murder. One part '80s nostalgia and two parts gratuitous violence towards women, American Psycho is a scary staple with widely mixed reviews

      But, if you're looking to expand your horror knowledge sans torture porn, this is a pretty solid and super quotable option. I mean come on, don't you want to know if that guy "likes Huey Lewis and the News?"

      (Side note: definitely skip American Psycho's sequel. Not even Mila Kunis could save that train wreck.)

      American Psycho begins streaming on Hulu October 1st.

      Movies

      Ace Ventura: Pet Detective (10/1)
      Ace Ventura: When Nature Calls
      (10/1)
      American Psycho
      (10/1)
      American Psycho 2
      (10/1)
      An Eye for an Eye
      (10/1)
      Anaconda
      (10/1)
      Anacondas: The Hunt for the Blood Orchid
      (10/1)
      Barbie Presents: Thumbelina
      (10/1)
      Beacon Point
      (10/1)
      Bees Make Honey
      (10/1)
      Birthday Girl
      (10/15)
      Bitter Moon
      (10/1)
      Blindspot: Season 4 Premiere
      (10/13)
      Blue Steel
      (10/1)
      Bulletproof Monk
      (10/1)
      Call Me
      (10/1)
      Capture
      (10/1)
      Charlotte
      (10/1)
      Child’s Play
      (10/1)
      Children of the Corn II: The Final Sacrifice
      (10/1)
      Cinderella Man
      (10/1)
      Closer
      (10/1)
      Cocaine Godmother
      (10/1)
      Comic Book Villains
      (10/1)
      Daddy Day Care
      (10/1)
      Daddy’s Home 2
      (10/25)
      Dark Blue
      (10/1)
      Deadly Blessing
      (10/1)
      Death Wish 2
      (10/1)
      Dheepan
      (10/3)
      Double, Double, Toil and Trouble
      (10/1)
      Election
      (10/1)
      Evangeline
      (10/1)
      Extreme Justice
      (10/1)
      Flyboys
      (10/1)
      Frank & Johnny
      (10/1)
      Frank and Jesse
      (10/1)
      Frida
      (10/1)
      Galaxy Quest
      (10/1)
      Gods and Monsters
      (10/1)
      Gordy
      (10/1)
      Guess Who’s Coming to Dinner
      (10/1)
      Heist
      (10/1)
      Hot Tub Time Machine
      (10/1)
      How to Get Girls
      (10/1)
      Insomnia
      (10/1)
      Jayne Mansfield’s Car
      (10/1)
      Jim Norton: Please Be Offended
      (10/1)
      Joe the King
      (10/1)
      Kicking & Screaming
      (10/1)
      Lowlife
      (10/6)
      Ma Ma
      (10/3)
      More than a Game
      (10/1)
      Mullholland Drive
      (10/1)
      Music and Lyrics
      (10/1)
      Next Stop Wonderland
      (10/15)
      No Vacancy
      (10/1)
      Once Bitten
      (10/1)
      Pawn Shop Chronicles
      (10/1)
      Pieces of April
      (10/1)
      Platoon
      (10/1)
      Prancer
      (10/1)
      Pyewacket
      (10/6)
      Racer and the Jailbird
      (10/29)
      Raging Bull
      (10/1)
      RBG
      (10/3)
      Reasonable Doubt
      (10/1)
      Rec
      (10/1)
      Rec 2
      (10/1)
      Rec 3
      (10/1)
      Rec 4
      (10/1)
      Results
      (10/22)
      Robocop
      (10/1)
      Robocop 2
      (10/1)
      Robocop 3
      (10/1)
      Rust and Bone
      (10/1)
      Scary Movie
      (10/1)
      Six Weeks
      (10/1)
      Split Image
      (10/1)
      Stage Beauty
      (10/1)
      Stand Up Guys
      (10/1)
      Starship Troopers
      (10/1)
      Tadpole
      (10/26)
      Texas Chainsaw Massacre II
      (10/1)
      The Armstrong Lie
      (10/1)
      The Arrival
      (10/1)
      The Blair Witch Project
      (10/1)
      The Blair Witch Project: Book of Shadows
      (10/1)
      The Eye
      (10/3)
      The Glass Shield
      (10/1)
      The Gospel According to Andre
      (10/4)
      The House of Spirits
      (10/1)
      The Long Riders
      (10/1)
      The Miracle Season
      (10/14)
      The Music Never Stopped
      (10/1)
      The Night We Never Met
      (10/1)
      The Nightmare Before Christmas
      (10/2)
      The Others
      (10/1)
      The Peacemaker
      (10/1)
      The Presidio
      (10/1)
      The Prophecy
      (10/1)
      The Quest of Alaine Ducasse
      (10/11)
      The Second Arrival
      (10/1)
      The Simone Biles Story
      (10/1)
      The Son of No One
      (10/1)
      The Tailor of Panama
      (10/1)
      The Way of the Gun
      (10/1)
      Trees Lounge
      (10/1)
      Valley of the Dolls
      (10/1)
      Wes Craven Presents: They
      (10/1)
      What We Become
      (10/10)
      Wild Bill
      (10/1)
      Zombies of Mass Destruction
      (10/1)

      TV

      60 Days In: Complete Season 4 (10/1)
      Alguien Te Mira: Complete Season 1 (10/8)
      America’s Book of Secrets: Complete Seasons 1 & 2 (10/1)
      American Pickers: Complete Season 18 (10/1)
      Ancient Aliens: Complete Season 4 (10/1)
      Basilisk: The Ouka Ninja (Dubbed): Complete Season 1 (10/14)
      Black-ish: Season 5 Premiere (10/17)
      Bob’s Burgers: Season 9 Premiere (10/1)
      Cardcaptor Sakura: Clear Card (Dubbed): Complete Season 1 (10/4)
      Child Support: Season 2 Premiere (10/6)
      Darling in the Franxx (Dubbed): Complete Season 1 (10/19)
      Dot.: Complete Season 2A (10/6)
      El Clon: Complete Season 1 (10/1)
      El Fantasma de Elena: Complete Season 1 (10/16)
      Escaping Polygamy: Complete Season 3 (10/1)
      Family Guy: Season 16 Premiere (10/1)
      Fresh Off The Boat: Season 5 Premiere (10/6)
      Hoarders: Complete Season 9 (10/1)
      Hunting Hitler: Complete Season 3 (10/1)
      Intervention: Complete Season 20 (10/1)
      Into The Dark: THE BODY: Series Premiere (10/5)
      Kingpin: Complete Season 1 (10/1)
      La Diosa Coronada: Complete Season 1 (10/5)
      Light As a Feather: Complete Season 1 Premiere (10/12)
      Little Women: Atlanta: Complete Season 4 (10/1)
      Little Women: LA: Complete Season 6 (10/1)
      Married at First Sight: Complete Season 5 (10/1)
      Midnight, Texas: Season 2 Premiere (10/27)
      Miles from Tomorrowland: Complete Season 3 (10/10)
      Nightwatch: Complete Season 3 (10/1)
      Overlord (Dubbed): Complete Season 2 (10/24)
      Ray Donovan: Season 6 Premiere (10/28) available only with Showtime premium add-on
      Shark Tank: Season 10 Premiere (10/8)
      Speechless: Season 3 Premiere (10/6)
      Splitting Up Together: Season 2 Premiere (10/17)
      Station 19: Season 2 Premiere (10/5)
      Storage Wars: Complete Season 11 (10/1)
      Superstore: Season 4 Premiere (10/5)
      The Alec Baldwin Show: Series Premiere (10/15)
      The Conners: Series Premiere (10/17)
      The Curse of Oak Island: Complete Season 5 (10/1)
      The Kids are Alright: Series Premiere (10/17)
      The Real Housewives of Atlanta: Complete Season 10 (10/5)
      The Real Housewives of New Jersey: Complete Season 8 (10/4)
      The Rookie: Series Premiere (10/17)
      The Simpsons: Season 30 Premiere (10/1)
      Undercover High: Complete Season 1 (10/1)
      Will & Grace: Season 10 Premiere (10/5)

      Expiring on 10/31

      13 Going on 30
      28 Weeks Later
      American Gigolo
      Any Given Sunday
      Avenging Force
      Babe
      Barfly
      Black Rain
      Body Count
      Boomerang
      Bull Durham
      Cold War
      Curse of the Starving Class
      Dead Hands Dig Deep
      Deuce Bigalow: Male Gigolo
      Double Whammy
      Eight Men Out
      Elizabethtown
      Fled
      Godzilla
      Hidalgo
      High Noon
      How to Build a Machine
      In & Out
      Invaders from Mars

      Jackie Brown
      Journey to Space
      Kazaam
      Murphy’s Law
      New in Town
      No Way Out
      Number One with a Bullet
      Original Sin
      Patriot Games
      Planet Hulk
      Point Break
      Rescue Dawn

      Signs
      Sixteen Candles
      Stir of Echoes
      Street Smart
      The 13th Warrior
      The Brady Bunch Movie
      The Elephant Man

      There Will Be Blood
      Thor: Tales of Asgard

      True Colors
      Unbreakable
      Universal Soldier
      Up Close and Personal
      Pawn
      Precious Cargo

      Pretty in Pink
      Rabbit Hole
      Rare Birds
      The Rock

      Salsa
      Sex Drive
      Six Shooters

      Sleepers
      Snake Eyes
      Spaceballs
      Superstar
      The Suffering
      This is Spinal Tap
      Trade

      Witness
      Wooly Boys

      Original Article : HERE ; This post was curated & posted using : RealSpecific

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      Source Here: What’s streaming on Hulu this October
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      Alaine Ducasse

      Image: Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer Studios

      Buckle up, ghost friends! With October just days away, the aptly named "Huluween" is right around the corner.

      From charmingly creepy picks like The Nightmare Before Christmas to hair-raising horrors like The Others, Hulu's Halloween selection has a little something for everyone. 

      But, even if you're not looking to get into the spooky festivities (scaredy cat!), there's plenty to choose from—including the original RoboCop trilogy and the criminally underrated Hot Tub Time Machine.

      Plan your October fright fest with the complete list of everything coming to and going from Hulu this October below.

      Top Pick: American Psycho (2000)

      Ah, American Psycho: the Christian Bale film that gave me yet another reason to not date creepy Wall Street dudes. 

      Based on Bret Easton Ellis's novel of the same name, this horror flick chronicles the "antics" of Patrick Bateman—a wealthy investment banker with passions for skin care, pop rock, and murder. One part '80s nostalgia and two parts gratuitous violence towards women, American Psycho is a scary staple with widely mixed reviews

      But, if you're looking to expand your horror knowledge sans torture porn, this is a pretty solid and super quotable option. I mean come on, don't you want to know if that guy "likes Huey Lewis and the News?"

      (Side note: definitely skip American Psycho's sequel. Not even Mila Kunis could save that train wreck.)

      American Psycho begins streaming on Hulu October 1st.

      Movies

      Ace Ventura: Pet Detective (10/1)
      Ace Ventura: When Nature Calls
      (10/1)
      American Psycho
      (10/1)
      American Psycho 2
      (10/1)
      An Eye for an Eye
      (10/1)
      Anaconda
      (10/1)
      Anacondas: The Hunt for the Blood Orchid
      (10/1)
      Barbie Presents: Thumbelina
      (10/1)
      Beacon Point
      (10/1)
      Bees Make Honey
      (10/1)
      Birthday Girl
      (10/15)
      Bitter Moon
      (10/1)
      Blindspot: Season 4 Premiere
      (10/13)
      Blue Steel
      (10/1)
      Bulletproof Monk
      (10/1)
      Call Me
      (10/1)
      Capture
      (10/1)
      Charlotte
      (10/1)
      Child’s Play
      (10/1)
      Children of the Corn II: The Final Sacrifice
      (10/1)
      Cinderella Man
      (10/1)
      Closer
      (10/1)
      Cocaine Godmother
      (10/1)
      Comic Book Villains
      (10/1)
      Daddy Day Care
      (10/1)
      Daddy’s Home 2
      (10/25)
      Dark Blue
      (10/1)
      Deadly Blessing
      (10/1)
      Death Wish 2
      (10/1)
      Dheepan
      (10/3)
      Double, Double, Toil and Trouble
      (10/1)
      Election
      (10/1)
      Evangeline
      (10/1)
      Extreme Justice
      (10/1)
      Flyboys
      (10/1)
      Frank & Johnny
      (10/1)
      Frank and Jesse
      (10/1)
      Frida
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      Expiring on 10/31

      13 Going on 30
      28 Weeks Later
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      Original Article : HERE ; This post was curated & posted using : RealSpecific

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      Source Here: What’s streaming on Hulu this October
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      3335
      Kelly Slater’s Artificial Surf Pool Is Really Making Waveshttps://dietandweightloss.tips4all.eu/kelly-slaters-artificial-surf-pool-is-really-making-waves/ Sun, 23 Sep 2018 18:21:34 +0000 https://dietandweightloss.tips4all.eu/?p=3332

      Adam Fincham is trying to make waves with a Tupperware full of agave and an avocado.

      Internal waves, specifically—the kind that exist in stratified fluid. Fincham is standing at a metal chef’s table in the kitchen at Kelly Slater’s Surf Ranch, in toasty Lemoore, California. A chef is in the kitchen preparing salmon grain bowls for the assemblage of pro surfers hanging around outside, but Fincham is intent on his own concoction. He’s pouring water against the curved side of a spoon, directly into the corner of the 7-by-7-inch container filled with the syrupy agave. Now, on top of that, he’s creating a lighter layer of water. Just like the ocean.

      Before Adam Fincham, lead engineer at the Kelly Slater Surf Ranch, was exposed to wave tanks in Europe, he thought waves were "the most bullshit thing ever," he says.

      Ryan Young

      He takes what he calls his wave generator—the avocado—and drops it gently into the Tupperware. Look from the side, he urges me. I crouch down and stare into the agave. Sure enough, in the layer of thick brown syrup, a tiny wave peels off the side of the Tupperware and rolls toward the other end of the container.

      “See the wave coming across?” Fincham says to me. “Those are all over the ocean. Back and forth, back and forth.”

      Fincham appears to delight in this, but his role at the Surf Ranch—where the inaugural Surf Ranch Pro competition begins tomorrow—is much bigger than kitchen science experiments. Several years ago, Fincham was tasked with creating the perfect wave. Not good, not great, perfect. It’s a word you hear a lot when people talk about the Surf Ranch. And on this particular day in late August, just two weeks before a bunch of professional surfers and 5,000 spectators will descend on the ranch for a nationally televised competition, something isn’t quite right with the perfect wave.

      Fincham wasn’t always so obsessed with waves. At one point in his career, the aerospace engineer and self-described turbulence snob thought they were “the most bullshit thing ever. ‘Who does waves? You must be an idiot if you do waves, because you’re not smart enough to do anything else.’ There was my line of thinking. I’m very serious.”

      The control tower, an elevated shack on the west side of the Surf Ranch, is where wave operators push buttons and summon waves on demand—like Uber, but for waves.

      Ryan Young

      Fincham, 52, was born in England and raised in Jamaica. He was a tinkerer from an early age. Growing up in the Carribean, he says, meant he often made his own gadgets, from GI Joe accessories to automotive parts, rather than purchasing them. His father, a biochemistry teacher, eventually ended up relocating from Jamaica to Southern California to teach at USC. Fincham followed him there, dropping his physics studies at the University of the West Indies and picking up aerospace engineering at USC in 1985. The department was heavy with fluid dynamics experts; thus began Fincham’s relationship with fluids, or, rather, the movement of fluids.

      But even then, he was still more interested in geophysical turbulence than he was in waves. In the field of turbulence, much remains unsolved; Fincham saw this as a type of job security. After earning his PhD in geophysical fluid dynamics in 1994, he took off for France, where he worked at the National Center for Scientific Research.

      It was through a program called Hydralab, a network of European research institutions with experimental hydraulic systems, that Fincham says he began to shed his snobbery against waves. He started conducting experiments on the Coriolis, the largest rotating water tank in the world. In Hannover, Germany, he worked on a 1,000-foot-long wave tank, one that generated waves 8 feet high. He conducted research on on a wave tank in Barcelona, Spain, and on a wave flume in Delft, Holland.

      “As I started to learn more about nonlinear waves and internal solitary waves, I started getting more interested in surface waves,” Fincham tells me. We’re now sitting at a picnic table on the patio at the Surf Ranch. Half a dozen pro surfers are there for practice runs that day, including Lakey Peterson, Carissa Moore, Coco Ho, Kolohe Andino, Griffin Colapinto, and Caroline Marks, who at 16 is the youngest female surfer ever to qualify for the championship tour.

      Every 20 minutes or so, Fincham stands up and stares at the lagoon, when a wave is peeling toward us. It’s moving from the north side of the lagoon to the south end. To the untrained eye, the wave looks, well, perfect: a fast-moving, minute-long wave about 6 feet high, with plenty of swell for well-executed cutbacks and a generous barrel, the cylindrical part of the wave that some surfers spend their whole lives trying to get lost in. Fincham is displeased with something, though. He makes a phone call. Then he resumes his story.

      After nine years in France, Fincham ended up back “home”: He got a job in the aerospace engineering department at USC, where he began working with oceanographers to study how turbulence impacts the ocean’s ecology. He didn’t know who Kelly Slater was when, in 2006, folks in his department said the world champion surfer had been inquiring “about making some kind of surfing wave.”

      Part of the draw of the wave at the Surf Ranch is this barrel, the cylindrical part of a surface wave that some surfers spend their whole lives trying to get lost in.

      Ryan Young

      Fincham certainly knows Slater well now: He eventually became a cofounder of the Kelly Slater Wave Co. According to Fincham, though, this man-made wave almost didn’t happen at all. When Slater first proposed the idea to the engineers at USC, he had envisioned a circular wave pool. “He wanted the perfect wave, but he also wanted an infinite wave. The idea was that the wave would go around in a never-ending ring,” Fincham says. “That was his initial vision.” (WIRED requested an interview with Slater several times, but his spokesperson said the surfer was unavailable due to his responsibilities in hurricane-stricken Hawaii.)

      Two members of the USC faculty, Tony Maxworthy and Fred Browand, disagreed on whether this never-ending perfect wave was even feasible, Fincham says. The standoff ended with Browand slapping a note on Maxworthy’s office door, waving the white flag. They would attempt to make the wave. Fincham would take the lead on the project.

      Browand, who is now retired and lives in a retirement community east of Los Angeles, tells me over the phone he doesn’t recall any specific disagreement about the circular wave. But, he remembers thinking at the time, “it’s a heck of a jump between doing something in a lab and generating a full-scale wave that would be surfable.”

      “Adam is a smart guy, there’s no doubt about that, and he has a lot of imagination,” Browand says. “I’m impressed that he got this thing going from what started off as a 2-inch wave.”

      After several months of testing that tiny wave, Fincham went down to the headquarters of Quiksilver, Slater’s sponsor at the time, and presented his findings. While Fincham says he lobbied at first to keep the tests going within the university laboratories, it was ultimately decided that they would move Slater’s wave out of USC, both for space and “for IP reasons.” It’s the technology, he says, that sets this place apart.

      Each surf pro gets eight runs during a practice session at the Surf Ranch, before taking a break. Lakey Peterson, the No. 2 female surfer on the world tour, waits for the hydrofoil to make its approach, then paddles into the wave. Video by Lauren Goode

      It’s obvious upon arrival at the Surf Ranch that Slater and team did not end up sticking with a circular wave pool.

      From 2007 until 2012 they were married to that idea. Patent filings from that time show a circular pool with a fixed outer wall and a rotating inner wall equipped with one or more hydrofoils—winglike structures that move through the water to create movement and lift. The team constructed a circular prototype tank in a giant warehouse in Culver City. But from the start, it was a challenge, Fincham says. “The big problem when you’re going around in a circle is you have to make sure the water is calm by the time it comes around again,” he says. At some point, they determined that a linear wave pool would be easier, cheaper, and, importantly, quicker to build.

      The Kelly Slater Wave Co. purchased the 20-acre property in Lemoore in 2014. According to a report in Bloomberg, Slater chose Lemoore, a small city with a population of around 25,000, primarily because it was inexpensive. The property cost around $575,000, roughly half the price of a two-bedroom condo in San Francisco. The fact that two lakes already existed on the property also made it appealing. But if Slater was hoping for discretion when he chose Lemoore, which is located more than 100 miles from the California coastline, that part didn’t quite pan out: The internet has been in a frenzy about this man-made wave since Slater first started filing patent applications.

      By 2015 the first version of the wave pool was operational. It is not open to the public for surfing, and may never be—although if you’re a Slater buddy, like Eddie Vedder or Tony Hawk, or a philanthropic organization, or an LA-based venture capitalist or tech executive with deep pockets, you can arrange an outing there.

      In May of 2016 WSL Holdings, the parent company of the World Surf League, bought the Kelly Slater Wave Company, emphasizing its value as a practice facility and hinting at a future filled with competitive events. The ranch’s name technically changed to the WSL Surf Ranch, but almost everyone I spoke to for this story still calls it the Kelly Slater Surf Ranch.

      In 2017, after an extensive overhaul, Surf Ranch 2.0 launched. Wave pool overhauls aren’t a matter of just tweaking the software or changing the location of a button. It means draining the entire lagoon, changing the contour of the bottom, fixing large pieces of equipment. It’s a massive, ongoing construction project. The Surf Ranch as it exists now, the 2.1 version, would look pretty darn good to any outsider; and yet it’s still considered a prototype.

      This prototype is a giant, rectangular, freshwater lagoon, 700 yards long. Directly next to the lagoon is another freshwater lake, one that is still used for wakeboarding and paddleboarding. The area is surrounded by dozens of trees, some of them planted to create a buffer for wind, since wind affects the formation of the wave. This cluster of conspicuous trees is the only thing that gives the place away as you’re driving down Jackson Avenue in Lemoore.

      Upon entering the Surf Ranch, it’s easy to drop into surf lingo: Everyone seems stoked to be there, and yet there’s a mellow vibe. There’s a gorgeous, airy, wood-paneled TV room where surfers chill out, watching video feeds from the wave pool and charging their phones. Framed photos of Slater and a few of his trophies serve as decor. The TV room opens up into the “boardroom,” where, in place of whiteboards and endlessly irritating teleconference systems, there are more than three dozen FireWire surfboards. Slater keeps a small quiver here too, in an open locker with his name on it.

      Wave height at the Surf Ranch averages around 6 feet, the size used by pros like Carissa Moore. For beginners the wave operators can dial it down to a 3-foot "intermediate" curls.

      Ryan Young

      The wave pool itself is jaw-dropping—not quite like standing on the cliffs at Nazare, or what I’d imagine that to be, but stunning in its juxtaposition to the landscape. Here’s a glassy, 6-foot wave, rising from the flat, dry grounds of Lemoore. The lagoon is filled with 15 million gallons of UV-and-chlorine-treated water. At its deepest point, it’s 9 feet; at its most shallow point along the wave path, it's three-and-a-half feet. Alongside it, a 100-ton hydrofoil—covered by tarps—runs along a fence, like a locomotive. The hydrofoil is pulled by cables, which spool out of two winch drums on either side of the lagoon. (Fincham calls the housing for these winch drums the “twin towers.”) All of this is powered by an electric motor.

      Even the lifeguards seem to be a part of the well-oiled machinery. On the day I’m there, they’re on Jet Ski duty for the surfers taking practice runs. This is all in preparation for the upcoming Surf Ranch Pro event. The lifeguards bark wave orders into their radios, as though they’re ordering up a burger. These calls are received in the control tower, an elevated shack over on the west side of the lagoon.

      A lifeguard trained in big-wave surfing rescue monitors the lagoon alongside Bowline, the Ranch's unofficial mascot.

      Ryan Young

      A Surf Ranch wave operator named Matt calls up a "CT3" wave, named after the Championship Tour. More than 50 types of wave can be produced at the push of a button.

      Ryan Young

      Up in the control tower, this Uberfication of surfing becomes even more apparent. Upon receiving the command from one of the lifeguards, a wave operator named Matt goes to a drop-down menu on the screen of a Siemens-made control system and selects a wave profile. He pushes a blue button, and, just like that, launches a wave.

      I’m a relatively new surfer myself, so I don’t get “barreled” at the ranch. Instead, I settle for a Jet Ski ride alongside Lakey Peterson, 23, and Griffin Colapinto, 20, as they surf. As we scoot along, I’m hyper-aware of the noisy hydrofoil lurking behind the wave—and the pool’s concrete bottom beneath it—but the 6-foot wave commands the same amount of respect as it would if were were in the ocean. Which is to say, this wave isn’t messing around. It’s powerful.

      Griffin Colapinto grew up in San Clemente, California, known for its many consistent surf breaks. Here at the Surf Ranch, he experiences a new definition of "consistent."

      Ryan Young

      “One thing I do notice that’s different between this and the ocean is the speed of the wave,” Peterson tells me. “Here’s a little bit more ... unforgiving. If you catch a bit of an edge or a rail, this wave is just moving no matter what. Ocean surfing, the wave is moving no matter what as well, but generally they’re a little bit slower.”

      The wave also wears surfers out. Carissa Moore, a three-time world champ, says she stressed her hamstring abductor at the ranch. (A lifeguard tells me that other injuries, like concussions, have occurred, and that the guard staff require surfers to use hand signals in the pool, so they can stay alert to more serious situations.) “It puts so much stress on the body,” Moore says. “As a surfer we paddle, probably, 40 percent of the time. The other 40 percent we’re sitting and 20 percent we’re surfing. And here it’s totally flipped. You use your legs so much more. You have to take breaks.”

      Three-time world champion Carissa Moore says she experienced a minor injury at the Surf Ranch due to the stress it puts on the body. “As a surfer we paddle 40 percent of the time. The other 40 percent we’re sitting and 20 percent we’re surfing. And here it’s totally flipped.”

      Ryan Young

      “It’s cool, though,” Moore adds. “It’s just different.”

      “The technology is incredible,” Peterson says. “I always say this is like the first iPhone, right? Who knows what this will be like when there’s an iPhone X version of this wave out here.”

      Wave pools are not new. The first commercial wave pool in the United States, Big Surf, opened in Tempe, Arizona, back in 1969. According to an article published that year in Life, its founder, a construction engineer named Philip Dexter, “could see surf breaking where others saw only 20 acres of sage-grown desert,” some 350 miles from the nearest ocean. Distance to ocean aside, you could say the same of Slater. Big Surf is still open for business. Disney has a wave pool, too, at its water theme park in Lake Buena Vista, Florida. It’s been around for nearly 30 years.

      But over the past decade or so, a series of wave pools has popped up (see what I did there) that are promising better waves. Three of the more prominent examples include Slater’s ranch, scattered surf parks launched by Spain-based Wavegarden, and BSR Surf Park in Waco, Texas, which is powered by American Wave Machines technology. Words like “powerful,” “the real deal,” and, yes, “perfect” are used to describe these engineered walls of turbulence. Slater himself has characterized his wave as a “freak of technology.” These aren’t meant for bobbing around on your family vacation. These are designed for surfing.

      That doesn’t mean they’re not also designed for fun or, more importantly, for profit. NLand, a surf park that opened in Austin in 2016, is open to the public. The park charges between $60 and $90 an hour for access to the lagoon, depending on the level of wave you’re looking to surf. Visitors can drink beer, practice yoga, or listen to a concert while they’re there.

      “We try to add on other things, to make a place where people want to stick around,” says Doug Coors, the founder and chief executive of NLand. “I consider it similar to a ski area, where someone skis a bunch of black runs and someone else skis the green runs but they’re all enjoying a beer together afterward.”

      For a place like NLand, the volume of waves is also critical: You have to churn out enough waves to make people feel like they’re getting their money’s worth. For NLand this equates to around 24 waves an hour. But making waves is also power-intensive. Coors says the energy it takes to create a 30-second wave is equivalent to 10 V6 engines running for the same amount of time.

      One could argue that it’s the quality, not the quantity, of the wave that really matters. And if you accept that premise, then it becomes a discussion of how it’s being made. Artificial waves can be generated in a variety of ways: with pistons, with air chambers, with paddles, with water itself, dropped or skimmed along a body of water to create surface waves. Another way of doing it is with hydrofoils, which is what Slater and Fincham are using. The contouring of the bottom of the lagoon is key too, since that impacts how the waves will shape up.

      NLand has been using a hydrofoil system, as well. NLand is powered by technology developed by Wavegarden, the Spanish technology company that’s been making headlines in the artificial wave space as long as Slater has. The way chief commercial officer Fernando Odriozola describes it, the Wavegarden technology at NLand (as well as at another Wavegarden surf park in Wales) is “very similar” to the technology at the Slater ranch. For its future parks—and Wavegarden lists nearly 20 “coming soon” locations on its website—the company plans to switch to what it describes as a modular system, one that uses paddles.

      I ask Fincham what makes the Surf Ranch’s hydrofoil system technically different from others. Basically, what makes the Slater wave so special?

      Tarps along the sides and solar panels on top...

      Ryan Young

      ... hide the hydrofoil technology that Slater and Fincham are hyper-secretive about.

      Ryan Young

      Fincham and the World Surf League hate sharing these details. It’s why they’ve covered the hydrofoil system with tarps and topped it with solar panels, so drone operators can’t get a shot from above. Fincham volunteers that they’ve patented, specifically, “the method for generating the wave. It’s the hydrofoil in combination with the correct environment to make the wave.” Vagueness achieved.

      Fincham stops just short of launching into a seminar on the Goring method, but that’s who he cites next: Derek Garard Goring, who, he says, developed a method of generating “very nice waves with a paddle.” Fincham and his team took inspiration from Goring in designing the shape of a hydrofoil, which pushes water in a way Goring would recognize. It doesn’t drive the water up at all; it only pushes it sideways. Control the water, control the wave.

      Fincham stops our conversation again to stare at the wave, and I ask him what he’s looking for.

      “I don’t want to see too much whitewater coming off the fence there,” he says, pointing to the part of the wave that’s closest to the fence. It’s that left again—a wave peeling to the left of the surfer—barreling toward the south side of the lagoon. Where there should be an unblemished, clean face of a wave, there’s a spray of surf shooting up in the direction of the hydrofoil apparatus.

      “We saw it happen on one of the waves a while ago, and we’re trying to ascertain what control we have over it in this particular situation,” Fincham says. “This was designed to only make rights, and then we retrofit it to make lefts as well. So it’s not optimized for the lefts. It’s a weakness.”

      The bigger concern is losing water with such spray: Fincham says that on a hot day like this one, a quarter of a million gallons of water can evaporate from the lagoon. The splashing makes that worse. The perfect wave, it turns out, is a constant work in progress, an infinite loop of maintenance.

      On a hot day in Lemoore, more than 250,000 gallons of water can evaporate from the lagoon.

      Ryan Young

      Everyone has something to say about Kelly Slater’s Surf Ranch, both the ranch itself and what it represents: Man interfering with nature.

      Some people have expressed environmental concerns, saying that if artificial waves usurp popular surf spots, it could deprioritize the resources and attention being given to the protection of coastal breaks. It’s almost impossible not to think about water in some way or another as you’re driving to Lemoore, where using 15 million gallons for a beautiful barrel might seem less stoke-worthy if you’re part of the drought-stricken agricultural community.

      On my way to the ranch, along the I-5 corridor in the central part of the state, I pass more than a dozen signs lobbying for protections for surface water and aquifers, paid for by a group called Families Protecting the Valley. One such sign lives at the main intersection just before you get to the Surf Ranch.

      Fincham points out the lagoon was a lake before they bought the place—“Nothing’s changed there,” he says—and that a golf course is much more water intensive than a surf lagoon. There’s a golf course right down the road here, he says, pointing northeast. And Fincham says the ranch sources its electricity from solar farms. “We have an arrangement with PG&E where we buy the solar energy.”

      Coors, the founder of NLand in Texas, makes the same argument as Fincham on the topic of water usage. “Our lagoon is 14 acres, and we use less than a third of what a small 18-hole golf course would use in a year,” he says.

      But mostly, people want to talk about soul when they talk about the Surf Ranch. Surfing is supposed to be about connecting with the ocean, the thinking goes. It’s about waiting for the perfect wave, not pushing a button and having it appear. It’s about counterculture, sticking it to The Man, tuning one’s inner self to nature’s metronome. If surfing is poetry, artificial waves are AI-generated verse.

      Just like waiting in the lineup in the ocean. Except, not.

      Ryan Young

      A writer for Deadspin wondered whether man-made waves are the future of the sport or its “bastardization.” Outside described the wave pool future as “bleak,” and, since we’re all being honest here, a little boring. An article in Science reported that in the vociferous surf blogosphere surfers posit that wave pools “could breed obnoxious hordes of newbies who will further crowd ocean breaks.”

      “When surfing becomes pasteurized, it loses its edginees,” says Peter Neushul, a surf historian and visiting researcher at UC Santa Barbara. “I think it’s going to lead to some conflict, depending on what you believe ‘surfing’ is. Is it bonding with nature, experiencing the last frontier of the ocean? Or is it hopping in a chlorinated tank with a foil being dragged around?”

      Except the sport of surfing is also—and has been for a long time—about sponsorships, photo ops, and convincing inlanders that they too can possess an ounce of your beachy cool vibes if they just buy a sporty bikini, a branded T-shirt, a Baja hoodie. Surfing is a multibillion-dollar industry, and marketing executives will be damned if they don’t find a way to make the whole thing a little more ... predictable.

      The debate will come into sharp focus in the run-up to the 2020 Summer Olympics in Tokyo, where surfing will make its debut as an Olympic sport. While the International Surfing Association has issued a statement saying that the 2020 surfing events will take place in the ocean, at Tsurigasaki Beach in Chiba, plenty of people have surmised that Olympic events beyond that could occur in some kind of wave pool, especially if the natural location doesn’t lend itself to good surf.

      Sooner than that, though, is the Surf Ranch Pro in Lemoore, which kicks off tomorrow. It’s the eighth stop on the WSL’s Championship Tour. Nike-owned Hurley is sponsoring it, and the event will be broadcast exclusively on CBS, straight from the lagoon into your living room. On the day I visited there in August, a crew was already building scaffolding for the giant jumbotron.

      “That’s why this is such a huge asset for the WSL, and for surfing,” says Peterson, the No. 2 female surfer on the tour. “You can schedule it. I can tell all my friends if they want to watch me, like, ‘Hey, I’m surfing at 10:32 on Tuesday morning.’“

      Peterson calls the Surf Ranch's technology "incredible." "I always say this is like the first iPhone, right? Who knows what this will be like when there’s an iPhone X version of this wave out here.”

      Ryan Young

      But Peterson continues, “Which is sort of ... I always think in some ways that’s the beauty of the ocean, you know? You’ve got to wait on the ocean. And I hope we never lose that. But this is a great addition to that.”

      That’s another word I hear a lot at the ranch: addition. The pro surfers I talk to aren’t interested in trashing Slater’s wave; that’s like asking NBA up-and-comers to critique LeBron James while hanging out at his house. They’ll give their honest assessment, but they’re quick to point out that it’s a great practice facility. “There’s haters for sure,” Moore says. “But it’s not going to take away from surfing the ocean. It’s an addition.”

      What may be a valuable addition for pros could also be an opportunity for not-yet-pros—or never-pros, like me.

      “I think this has the potential to cut through socioeconomic classes. Surfing has mostly reached a very narrow slice of our country’s demographic,” says Sachi Cunningham, a journalism professor and documentarian who is working on a film about female big-wave surfers. “If surfing becomes more accessible, it has the ability to cut through gender, race, disabilities.” (Both the Surf Ranch and NLand have hosted surf events for disability support groups.)

      Really, surfing has benefited from technology for decades. Neushul, the historian, lays out a lot of these points in a book he coauthored called The World in the Curl: An Unconventional History of Surfing. Everything from neoprene to foam to fiberglass to buoys that collect wave data for the military have, in some way or another, changed surfing.

      “Surfing exploded in the post–World War II era, and that’s partly due to materials and technology,” he says. The Jet Ski I rode on that day at the ranch is a piece of technology that allows big wave surfers to be towed into monstrous waves, ones that were previously unconquerable.

      Super-secret hydrofoil-generated barrels are, perhaps, just the next wave of technology to transform the sport. But, as I’m learning, how revolutionary it really is depends on who you ask.

      Fincham, of course, believes it is revolutionary. It’s why he took on the project when a famous surfer he didn’t know anything about showed up at his lab and proposed the perfect wave. It’s why he keeps iterating on it, and why asking him about waves leads to an impromptu science project in the kitchen.

      It’s why he wants to try building a bigger wave—maybe not 20 feet, since that would be dangerous, he says, but something that accommodates taller surfers. It’s why the WSL has “site identified” in places like Palm Beach, Florida; Australia; France; Brazil; Japan—because the organization believes this prototype can exist elsewhere.

      It’s why he’s still obsessing over it now, that wave that’s showing just a little bit of whitewater where it shouldn’t. Fincham is nowhere to be found when I leave the Surf Ranch in the late afternoon, but there’s a good chance he’s off somewhere staring at that left, the one that’s not yet perfect.

      Original Article : HERE ; This post was curated & posted using : RealSpecific

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      Adam Fincham is trying to make waves with a Tupperware full of agave and an avocado.

      Internal waves, specifically—the kind that exist in stratified fluid. Fincham is standing at a metal chef’s table in the kitchen at Kelly Slater’s Surf Ranch, in toasty Lemoore, California. A chef is in the kitchen preparing salmon grain bowls for the assemblage of pro surfers hanging around outside, but Fincham is intent on his own concoction. He’s pouring water against the curved side of a spoon, directly into the corner of the 7-by-7-inch container filled with the syrupy agave. Now, on top of that, he’s creating a lighter layer of water. Just like the ocean.

      Before Adam Fincham, lead engineer at the Kelly Slater Surf Ranch, was exposed to wave tanks in Europe, he thought waves were "the most bullshit thing ever," he says.

      Ryan Young

      He takes what he calls his wave generator—the avocado—and drops it gently into the Tupperware. Look from the side, he urges me. I crouch down and stare into the agave. Sure enough, in the layer of thick brown syrup, a tiny wave peels off the side of the Tupperware and rolls toward the other end of the container.

      “See the wave coming across?” Fincham says to me. “Those are all over the ocean. Back and forth, back and forth.”

      Fincham appears to delight in this, but his role at the Surf Ranch—where the inaugural Surf Ranch Pro competition begins tomorrow—is much bigger than kitchen science experiments. Several years ago, Fincham was tasked with creating the perfect wave. Not good, not great, perfect. It’s a word you hear a lot when people talk about the Surf Ranch. And on this particular day in late August, just two weeks before a bunch of professional surfers and 5,000 spectators will descend on the ranch for a nationally televised competition, something isn’t quite right with the perfect wave.

      Fincham wasn’t always so obsessed with waves. At one point in his career, the aerospace engineer and self-described turbulence snob thought they were “the most bullshit thing ever. ‘Who does waves? You must be an idiot if you do waves, because you’re not smart enough to do anything else.’ There was my line of thinking. I’m very serious.”

      The control tower, an elevated shack on the west side of the Surf Ranch, is where wave operators push buttons and summon waves on demand—like Uber, but for waves.

      Ryan Young

      Fincham, 52, was born in England and raised in Jamaica. He was a tinkerer from an early age. Growing up in the Carribean, he says, meant he often made his own gadgets, from GI Joe accessories to automotive parts, rather than purchasing them. His father, a biochemistry teacher, eventually ended up relocating from Jamaica to Southern California to teach at USC. Fincham followed him there, dropping his physics studies at the University of the West Indies and picking up aerospace engineering at USC in 1985. The department was heavy with fluid dynamics experts; thus began Fincham’s relationship with fluids, or, rather, the movement of fluids.

      But even then, he was still more interested in geophysical turbulence than he was in waves. In the field of turbulence, much remains unsolved; Fincham saw this as a type of job security. After earning his PhD in geophysical fluid dynamics in 1994, he took off for France, where he worked at the National Center for Scientific Research.

      It was through a program called Hydralab, a network of European research institutions with experimental hydraulic systems, that Fincham says he began to shed his snobbery against waves. He started conducting experiments on the Coriolis, the largest rotating water tank in the world. In Hannover, Germany, he worked on a 1,000-foot-long wave tank, one that generated waves 8 feet high. He conducted research on on a wave tank in Barcelona, Spain, and on a wave flume in Delft, Holland.

      “As I started to learn more about nonlinear waves and internal solitary waves, I started getting more interested in surface waves,” Fincham tells me. We’re now sitting at a picnic table on the patio at the Surf Ranch. Half a dozen pro surfers are there for practice runs that day, including Lakey Peterson, Carissa Moore, Coco Ho, Kolohe Andino, Griffin Colapinto, and Caroline Marks, who at 16 is the youngest female surfer ever to qualify for the championship tour.

      Every 20 minutes or so, Fincham stands up and stares at the lagoon, when a wave is peeling toward us. It’s moving from the north side of the lagoon to the south end. To the untrained eye, the wave looks, well, perfect: a fast-moving, minute-long wave about 6 feet high, with plenty of swell for well-executed cutbacks and a generous barrel, the cylindrical part of the wave that some surfers spend their whole lives trying to get lost in. Fincham is displeased with something, though. He makes a phone call. Then he resumes his story.

      After nine years in France, Fincham ended up back “home”: He got a job in the aerospace engineering department at USC, where he began working with oceanographers to study how turbulence impacts the ocean’s ecology. He didn’t know who Kelly Slater was when, in 2006, folks in his department said the world champion surfer had been inquiring “about making some kind of surfing wave.”

      Part of the draw of the wave at the Surf Ranch is this barrel, the cylindrical part of a surface wave that some surfers spend their whole lives trying to get lost in.

      Ryan Young

      Fincham certainly knows Slater well now: He eventually became a cofounder of the Kelly Slater Wave Co. According to Fincham, though, this man-made wave almost didn’t happen at all. When Slater first proposed the idea to the engineers at USC, he had envisioned a circular wave pool. “He wanted the perfect wave, but he also wanted an infinite wave. The idea was that the wave would go around in a never-ending ring,” Fincham says. “That was his initial vision.” (WIRED requested an interview with Slater several times, but his spokesperson said the surfer was unavailable due to his responsibilities in hurricane-stricken Hawaii.)

      Two members of the USC faculty, Tony Maxworthy and Fred Browand, disagreed on whether this never-ending perfect wave was even feasible, Fincham says. The standoff ended with Browand slapping a note on Maxworthy’s office door, waving the white flag. They would attempt to make the wave. Fincham would take the lead on the project.

      Browand, who is now retired and lives in a retirement community east of Los Angeles, tells me over the phone he doesn’t recall any specific disagreement about the circular wave. But, he remembers thinking at the time, “it’s a heck of a jump between doing something in a lab and generating a full-scale wave that would be surfable.”

      “Adam is a smart guy, there’s no doubt about that, and he has a lot of imagination,” Browand says. “I’m impressed that he got this thing going from what started off as a 2-inch wave.”

      After several months of testing that tiny wave, Fincham went down to the headquarters of Quiksilver, Slater’s sponsor at the time, and presented his findings. While Fincham says he lobbied at first to keep the tests going within the university laboratories, it was ultimately decided that they would move Slater’s wave out of USC, both for space and “for IP reasons.” It’s the technology, he says, that sets this place apart.

      Each surf pro gets eight runs during a practice session at the Surf Ranch, before taking a break. Lakey Peterson, the No. 2 female surfer on the world tour, waits for the hydrofoil to make its approach, then paddles into the wave. Video by Lauren Goode

      It’s obvious upon arrival at the Surf Ranch that Slater and team did not end up sticking with a circular wave pool.

      From 2007 until 2012 they were married to that idea. Patent filings from that time show a circular pool with a fixed outer wall and a rotating inner wall equipped with one or more hydrofoils—winglike structures that move through the water to create movement and lift. The team constructed a circular prototype tank in a giant warehouse in Culver City. But from the start, it was a challenge, Fincham says. “The big problem when you’re going around in a circle is you have to make sure the water is calm by the time it comes around again,” he says. At some point, they determined that a linear wave pool would be easier, cheaper, and, importantly, quicker to build.

      The Kelly Slater Wave Co. purchased the 20-acre property in Lemoore in 2014. According to a report in Bloomberg, Slater chose Lemoore, a small city with a population of around 25,000, primarily because it was inexpensive. The property cost around $575,000, roughly half the price of a two-bedroom condo in San Francisco. The fact that two lakes already existed on the property also made it appealing. But if Slater was hoping for discretion when he chose Lemoore, which is located more than 100 miles from the California coastline, that part didn’t quite pan out: The internet has been in a frenzy about this man-made wave since Slater first started filing patent applications.

      By 2015 the first version of the wave pool was operational. It is not open to the public for surfing, and may never be—although if you’re a Slater buddy, like Eddie Vedder or Tony Hawk, or a philanthropic organization, or an LA-based venture capitalist or tech executive with deep pockets, you can arrange an outing there.

      In May of 2016 WSL Holdings, the parent company of the World Surf League, bought the Kelly Slater Wave Company, emphasizing its value as a practice facility and hinting at a future filled with competitive events. The ranch’s name technically changed to the WSL Surf Ranch, but almost everyone I spoke to for this story still calls it the Kelly Slater Surf Ranch.

      In 2017, after an extensive overhaul, Surf Ranch 2.0 launched. Wave pool overhauls aren’t a matter of just tweaking the software or changing the location of a button. It means draining the entire lagoon, changing the contour of the bottom, fixing large pieces of equipment. It’s a massive, ongoing construction project. The Surf Ranch as it exists now, the 2.1 version, would look pretty darn good to any outsider; and yet it’s still considered a prototype.

      This prototype is a giant, rectangular, freshwater lagoon, 700 yards long. Directly next to the lagoon is another freshwater lake, one that is still used for wakeboarding and paddleboarding. The area is surrounded by dozens of trees, some of them planted to create a buffer for wind, since wind affects the formation of the wave. This cluster of conspicuous trees is the only thing that gives the place away as you’re driving down Jackson Avenue in Lemoore.

      Upon entering the Surf Ranch, it’s easy to drop into surf lingo: Everyone seems stoked to be there, and yet there’s a mellow vibe. There’s a gorgeous, airy, wood-paneled TV room where surfers chill out, watching video feeds from the wave pool and charging their phones. Framed photos of Slater and a few of his trophies serve as decor. The TV room opens up into the “boardroom,” where, in place of whiteboards and endlessly irritating teleconference systems, there are more than three dozen FireWire surfboards. Slater keeps a small quiver here too, in an open locker with his name on it.

      Wave height at the Surf Ranch averages around 6 feet, the size used by pros like Carissa Moore. For beginners the wave operators can dial it down to a 3-foot "intermediate" curls.

      Ryan Young

      The wave pool itself is jaw-dropping—not quite like standing on the cliffs at Nazare, or what I’d imagine that to be, but stunning in its juxtaposition to the landscape. Here’s a glassy, 6-foot wave, rising from the flat, dry grounds of Lemoore. The lagoon is filled with 15 million gallons of UV-and-chlorine-treated water. At its deepest point, it’s 9 feet; at its most shallow point along the wave path, it's three-and-a-half feet. Alongside it, a 100-ton hydrofoil—covered by tarps—runs along a fence, like a locomotive. The hydrofoil is pulled by cables, which spool out of two winch drums on either side of the lagoon. (Fincham calls the housing for these winch drums the “twin towers.”) All of this is powered by an electric motor.

      Even the lifeguards seem to be a part of the well-oiled machinery. On the day I’m there, they’re on Jet Ski duty for the surfers taking practice runs. This is all in preparation for the upcoming Surf Ranch Pro event. The lifeguards bark wave orders into their radios, as though they’re ordering up a burger. These calls are received in the control tower, an elevated shack over on the west side of the lagoon.

      A lifeguard trained in big-wave surfing rescue monitors the lagoon alongside Bowline, the Ranch's unofficial mascot.

      Ryan Young

      A Surf Ranch wave operator named Matt calls up a "CT3" wave, named after the Championship Tour. More than 50 types of wave can be produced at the push of a button.

      Ryan Young

      Up in the control tower, this Uberfication of surfing becomes even more apparent. Upon receiving the command from one of the lifeguards, a wave operator named Matt goes to a drop-down menu on the screen of a Siemens-made control system and selects a wave profile. He pushes a blue button, and, just like that, launches a wave.

      I’m a relatively new surfer myself, so I don’t get “barreled” at the ranch. Instead, I settle for a Jet Ski ride alongside Lakey Peterson, 23, and Griffin Colapinto, 20, as they surf. As we scoot along, I’m hyper-aware of the noisy hydrofoil lurking behind the wave—and the pool’s concrete bottom beneath it—but the 6-foot wave commands the same amount of respect as it would if were were in the ocean. Which is to say, this wave isn’t messing around. It’s powerful.

      Griffin Colapinto grew up in San Clemente, California, known for its many consistent surf breaks. Here at the Surf Ranch, he experiences a new definition of "consistent."

      Ryan Young

      “One thing I do notice that’s different between this and the ocean is the speed of the wave,” Peterson tells me. “Here’s a little bit more ... unforgiving. If you catch a bit of an edge or a rail, this wave is just moving no matter what. Ocean surfing, the wave is moving no matter what as well, but generally they’re a little bit slower.”

      The wave also wears surfers out. Carissa Moore, a three-time world champ, says she stressed her hamstring abductor at the ranch. (A lifeguard tells me that other injuries, like concussions, have occurred, and that the guard staff require surfers to use hand signals in the pool, so they can stay alert to more serious situations.) “It puts so much stress on the body,” Moore says. “As a surfer we paddle, probably, 40 percent of the time. The other 40 percent we’re sitting and 20 percent we’re surfing. And here it’s totally flipped. You use your legs so much more. You have to take breaks.”

      Three-time world champion Carissa Moore says she experienced a minor injury at the Surf Ranch due to the stress it puts on the body. “As a surfer we paddle 40 percent of the time. The other 40 percent we’re sitting and 20 percent we’re surfing. And here it’s totally flipped.”

      Ryan Young

      “It’s cool, though,” Moore adds. “It’s just different.”

      “The technology is incredible,” Peterson says. “I always say this is like the first iPhone, right? Who knows what this will be like when there’s an iPhone X version of this wave out here.”

      Wave pools are not new. The first commercial wave pool in the United States, Big Surf, opened in Tempe, Arizona, back in 1969. According to an article published that year in Life, its founder, a construction engineer named Philip Dexter, “could see surf breaking where others saw only 20 acres of sage-grown desert,” some 350 miles from the nearest ocean. Distance to ocean aside, you could say the same of Slater. Big Surf is still open for business. Disney has a wave pool, too, at its water theme park in Lake Buena Vista, Florida. It’s been around for nearly 30 years.

      But over the past decade or so, a series of wave pools has popped up (see what I did there) that are promising better waves. Three of the more prominent examples include Slater’s ranch, scattered surf parks launched by Spain-based Wavegarden, and BSR Surf Park in Waco, Texas, which is powered by American Wave Machines technology. Words like “powerful,” “the real deal,” and, yes, “perfect” are used to describe these engineered walls of turbulence. Slater himself has characterized his wave as a “freak of technology.” These aren’t meant for bobbing around on your family vacation. These are designed for surfing.

      That doesn’t mean they’re not also designed for fun or, more importantly, for profit. NLand, a surf park that opened in Austin in 2016, is open to the public. The park charges between $60 and $90 an hour for access to the lagoon, depending on the level of wave you’re looking to surf. Visitors can drink beer, practice yoga, or listen to a concert while they’re there.

      “We try to add on other things, to make a place where people want to stick around,” says Doug Coors, the founder and chief executive of NLand. “I consider it similar to a ski area, where someone skis a bunch of black runs and someone else skis the green runs but they’re all enjoying a beer together afterward.”

      For a place like NLand, the volume of waves is also critical: You have to churn out enough waves to make people feel like they’re getting their money’s worth. For NLand this equates to around 24 waves an hour. But making waves is also power-intensive. Coors says the energy it takes to create a 30-second wave is equivalent to 10 V6 engines running for the same amount of time.

      One could argue that it’s the quality, not the quantity, of the wave that really matters. And if you accept that premise, then it becomes a discussion of how it’s being made. Artificial waves can be generated in a variety of ways: with pistons, with air chambers, with paddles, with water itself, dropped or skimmed along a body of water to create surface waves. Another way of doing it is with hydrofoils, which is what Slater and Fincham are using. The contouring of the bottom of the lagoon is key too, since that impacts how the waves will shape up.

      NLand has been using a hydrofoil system, as well. NLand is powered by technology developed by Wavegarden, the Spanish technology company that’s been making headlines in the artificial wave space as long as Slater has. The way chief commercial officer Fernando Odriozola describes it, the Wavegarden technology at NLand (as well as at another Wavegarden surf park in Wales) is “very similar” to the technology at the Slater ranch. For its future parks—and Wavegarden lists nearly 20 “coming soon” locations on its website—the company plans to switch to what it describes as a modular system, one that uses paddles.

      I ask Fincham what makes the Surf Ranch’s hydrofoil system technically different from others. Basically, what makes the Slater wave so special?

      Tarps along the sides and solar panels on top...

      Ryan Young

      ... hide the hydrofoil technology that Slater and Fincham are hyper-secretive about.

      Ryan Young

      Fincham and the World Surf League hate sharing these details. It’s why they’ve covered the hydrofoil system with tarps and topped it with solar panels, so drone operators can’t get a shot from above. Fincham volunteers that they’ve patented, specifically, “the method for generating the wave. It’s the hydrofoil in combination with the correct environment to make the wave.” Vagueness achieved.

      Fincham stops just short of launching into a seminar on the Goring method, but that’s who he cites next: Derek Garard Goring, who, he says, developed a method of generating “very nice waves with a paddle.” Fincham and his team took inspiration from Goring in designing the shape of a hydrofoil, which pushes water in a way Goring would recognize. It doesn’t drive the water up at all; it only pushes it sideways. Control the water, control the wave.

      Fincham stops our conversation again to stare at the wave, and I ask him what he’s looking for.

      “I don’t want to see too much whitewater coming off the fence there,” he says, pointing to the part of the wave that’s closest to the fence. It’s that left again—a wave peeling to the left of the surfer—barreling toward the south side of the lagoon. Where there should be an unblemished, clean face of a wave, there’s a spray of surf shooting up in the direction of the hydrofoil apparatus.

      “We saw it happen on one of the waves a while ago, and we’re trying to ascertain what control we have over it in this particular situation,” Fincham says. “This was designed to only make rights, and then we retrofit it to make lefts as well. So it’s not optimized for the lefts. It’s a weakness.”

      The bigger concern is losing water with such spray: Fincham says that on a hot day like this one, a quarter of a million gallons of water can evaporate from the lagoon. The splashing makes that worse. The perfect wave, it turns out, is a constant work in progress, an infinite loop of maintenance.

      On a hot day in Lemoore, more than 250,000 gallons of water can evaporate from the lagoon.

      Ryan Young

      Everyone has something to say about Kelly Slater’s Surf Ranch, both the ranch itself and what it represents: Man interfering with nature.

      Some people have expressed environmental concerns, saying that if artificial waves usurp popular surf spots, it could deprioritize the resources and attention being given to the protection of coastal breaks. It’s almost impossible not to think about water in some way or another as you’re driving to Lemoore, where using 15 million gallons for a beautiful barrel might seem less stoke-worthy if you’re part of the drought-stricken agricultural community.

      On my way to the ranch, along the I-5 corridor in the central part of the state, I pass more than a dozen signs lobbying for protections for surface water and aquifers, paid for by a group called Families Protecting the Valley. One such sign lives at the main intersection just before you get to the Surf Ranch.

      Fincham points out the lagoon was a lake before they bought the place—“Nothing’s changed there,” he says—and that a golf course is much more water intensive than a surf lagoon. There’s a golf course right down the road here, he says, pointing northeast. And Fincham says the ranch sources its electricity from solar farms. “We have an arrangement with PG&E where we buy the solar energy.”

      Coors, the founder of NLand in Texas, makes the same argument as Fincham on the topic of water usage. “Our lagoon is 14 acres, and we use less than a third of what a small 18-hole golf course would use in a year,” he says.

      But mostly, people want to talk about soul when they talk about the Surf Ranch. Surfing is supposed to be about connecting with the ocean, the thinking goes. It’s about waiting for the perfect wave, not pushing a button and having it appear. It’s about counterculture, sticking it to The Man, tuning one’s inner self to nature’s metronome. If surfing is poetry, artificial waves are AI-generated verse.

      Just like waiting in the lineup in the ocean. Except, not.

      Ryan Young

      A writer for Deadspin wondered whether man-made waves are the future of the sport or its “bastardization.” Outside described the wave pool future as “bleak,” and, since we’re all being honest here, a little boring. An article in Science reported that in the vociferous surf blogosphere surfers posit that wave pools “could breed obnoxious hordes of newbies who will further crowd ocean breaks.”

      “When surfing becomes pasteurized, it loses its edginees,” says Peter Neushul, a surf historian and visiting researcher at UC Santa Barbara. “I think it’s going to lead to some conflict, depending on what you believe ‘surfing’ is. Is it bonding with nature, experiencing the last frontier of the ocean? Or is it hopping in a chlorinated tank with a foil being dragged around?”

      Except the sport of surfing is also—and has been for a long time—about sponsorships, photo ops, and convincing inlanders that they too can possess an ounce of your beachy cool vibes if they just buy a sporty bikini, a branded T-shirt, a Baja hoodie. Surfing is a multibillion-dollar industry, and marketing executives will be damned if they don’t find a way to make the whole thing a little more ... predictable.

      The debate will come into sharp focus in the run-up to the 2020 Summer Olympics in Tokyo, where surfing will make its debut as an Olympic sport. While the International Surfing Association has issued a statement saying that the 2020 surfing events will take place in the ocean, at Tsurigasaki Beach in Chiba, plenty of people have surmised that Olympic events beyond that could occur in some kind of wave pool, especially if the natural location doesn’t lend itself to good surf.

      Sooner than that, though, is the Surf Ranch Pro in Lemoore, which kicks off tomorrow. It’s the eighth stop on the WSL’s Championship Tour. Nike-owned Hurley is sponsoring it, and the event will be broadcast exclusively on CBS, straight from the lagoon into your living room. On the day I visited there in August, a crew was already building scaffolding for the giant jumbotron.

      “That’s why this is such a huge asset for the WSL, and for surfing,” says Peterson, the No. 2 female surfer on the tour. “You can schedule it. I can tell all my friends if they want to watch me, like, ‘Hey, I’m surfing at 10:32 on Tuesday morning.’“

      Peterson calls the Surf Ranch's technology "incredible." "I always say this is like the first iPhone, right? Who knows what this will be like when there’s an iPhone X version of this wave out here.”

      Ryan Young

      But Peterson continues, “Which is sort of ... I always think in some ways that’s the beauty of the ocean, you know? You’ve got to wait on the ocean. And I hope we never lose that. But this is a great addition to that.”

      That’s another word I hear a lot at the ranch: addition. The pro surfers I talk to aren’t interested in trashing Slater’s wave; that’s like asking NBA up-and-comers to critique LeBron James while hanging out at his house. They’ll give their honest assessment, but they’re quick to point out that it’s a great practice facility. “There’s haters for sure,” Moore says. “But it’s not going to take away from surfing the ocean. It’s an addition.”

      What may be a valuable addition for pros could also be an opportunity for not-yet-pros—or never-pros, like me.

      “I think this has the potential to cut through socioeconomic classes. Surfing has mostly reached a very narrow slice of our country’s demographic,” says Sachi Cunningham, a journalism professor and documentarian who is working on a film about female big-wave surfers. “If surfing becomes more accessible, it has the ability to cut through gender, race, disabilities.” (Both the Surf Ranch and NLand have hosted surf events for disability support groups.)

      Really, surfing has benefited from technology for decades. Neushul, the historian, lays out a lot of these points in a book he coauthored called The World in the Curl: An Unconventional History of Surfing. Everything from neoprene to foam to fiberglass to buoys that collect wave data for the military have, in some way or another, changed surfing.

      “Surfing exploded in the post–World War II era, and that’s partly due to materials and technology,” he says. The Jet Ski I rode on that day at the ranch is a piece of technology that allows big wave surfers to be towed into monstrous waves, ones that were previously unconquerable.

      Super-secret hydrofoil-generated barrels are, perhaps, just the next wave of technology to transform the sport. But, as I’m learning, how revolutionary it really is depends on who you ask.

      Fincham, of course, believes it is revolutionary. It’s why he took on the project when a famous surfer he didn’t know anything about showed up at his lab and proposed the perfect wave. It’s why he keeps iterating on it, and why asking him about waves leads to an impromptu science project in the kitchen.

      It’s why he wants to try building a bigger wave—maybe not 20 feet, since that would be dangerous, he says, but something that accommodates taller surfers. It’s why the WSL has “site identified” in places like Palm Beach, Florida; Australia; France; Brazil; Japan—because the organization believes this prototype can exist elsewhere.

      It’s why he’s still obsessing over it now, that wave that’s showing just a little bit of whitewater where it shouldn’t. Fincham is nowhere to be found when I leave the Surf Ranch in the late afternoon, but there’s a good chance he’s off somewhere staring at that left, the one that’s not yet perfect.

      Original Article : HERE ; This post was curated & posted using : RealSpecific

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      See Full Article Here: Kelly Slater’s Artificial Surf Pool Is Really Making Waves
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      The working-class kid who became a writer: how a Kansas teacher helped change my lifehttps://dietandweightloss.tips4all.eu/the-working-class-kid-who-became-a-writer-how-a-kansas-teacher-helped-change-my-life/ Sun, 23 Sep 2018 13:39:48 +0000 https://dietandweightloss.tips4all.eu/?p=3328

      I grew up on a farm but was able to trade my familys backbreaking labor for a life of writing. My teacher, Mr Cheatham, is partly to thank for this

      ice chips

      Fourth grade shouldve been the hardest year of my early life.

      My parents had divorced during the previous summer and sold the house my dad built with his own hands next to a wheat field. Economic opportunity lacking in rural Kansas, we moved to the city of Wichita. After attending the same small-town school from kindergarten through third grade, I started the academic year in the Wichita school district.

      Series Embed

      A new school, new place, newly divorced parents with new romantic partners big challenges for a nine-year-old whose mom and dad were toiling on construction sites and in retail stock rooms, as opposed to volunteering with the parent-teacher association.

      Yet this began the happiest period of my childhood: the year and a half when Mr Cheatham was my teacher.

      In the basement of our old brick building without air conditioning, where teachers handed out ice chips at the hot start of the school year, Mr Cheatham had built a creative paradise for learning: Art supplies for creating magazine covers that bound our writing. A piano to accompany the plays Mr Cheatham by then a veteran teacher in his 50s, with a thick walrus mustache wrote for us to perform. A shuffle board court painted on the concrete floor, for practicing math as we kept score. A tent that, with a flashlight shone through it, revealed a night sky of constellations for memorizing. A loft, reached by a wooden ladder, stuffed with bean bags and books.

      Mr Cheatham was the teacher designated for advanced learners an opportunity that hadnt existed in my previous rural district and I thus was in his class again in fifth grade.

      Around 1990, I wrote my first bit of memoir in his class. I was from a family midwestern German Catholic farmers that wasnt much on reflecting. The demands of labor kept our eyes looking forward toward the next chore, the next bill, and our stoic culture frowned on self-expression.

      Sarah
      Sarah Smarsh, age 9 during fall 1989, soon after she began fourth grade in a new school district in Wichita, Kan. Photograph: Sarah Smarsh

      But Mr Cheatham had assigned us to write a story. For some reason, rather than making something up, I described a scene from my family, embedded with what I longed for someone to know: That my mom was unhappy, that money was tight, that I felt untethered from my home.

      Mr Cheatham mailed the raw tale to a national childrens magazine which published it as a two-page, illustrated spread. No one I knew had ever had their name in a magazine, let alone as the writer.

      By the time the story made it into print, I had already changed schools again. Largely owing to the chaos of poverty, I would attend eight schools by the time I finished ninth grade from a 2,000-student Wichita high school to a creaking two-room schoolhouse on the prairie containing 33 kids.

      The winter I left Mr Cheathams classroom, my mom took me to the elementary school during holiday break to tell him goodbye. I was wearing a navy wool coat from a discount store and felt embarrassed that my fine blond hair was wild with static from the cold, dry air. It was the last time I saw him.

      Around that time the recent publication of my story an unimaginable joy and validation I started telling my grandma, who was my primary caretaker for much of my upbringing, that someday I would write a book about our family.

      My grandparents left school after sixth and ninth grade to work. In some ways, my family has more in common with the farmers and laborers who often voted against school-district bond issues proposals to fund school renovations with a small tax increase than they do with me, a first-generation college graduate and former English professor.

      But they have always supported my ambitions and, seeing how education gave me opportunities they never had, are defenders of public education.

      Betsy DeVos is trying to get the Fed government to pay for GUNS for teachers, my grandma texted me recently. How insane is that?

      I shared with her that secretary of education DeVos, who would begrudge dollars to public schools and predatory-loan forgiveness to defrauded college students, reportedly owns ten yachts. Someone recently untied one of them, valued at $40 million, from an Ohio dock, setting it adrift on Lake Erie.

      Too bad she wasnt in it, Grandma texted back.

      The privatization DeVos seeks at the federal level began in my home state years ago. School districts sued the state in 1999 and 2010 for failing to provide adequate funding, the Kansas supreme court repeatedly ruled in their favor, and legislators refused to comply a constitutional crisis that Democrats and moderate Republicans have fought to resolve by ousting conservative representatives.

      Those who profit from the dismantling of public schools do so not just with tax dollars funneled into private school vouchers but with their control over information and ideas. One of the most overlooked threats to democracy is classroom curricula shaped by private interests for their own political, ideological and financial benefit.

      The current Kansas gubernatorial race reflects the states 20-year school-funding battle. Republican candidate Kris Kobach, best known for helming Donald Trumps busted voter-fraud commission and for unlawfully suppressing the votes of 30,000 Kansans as secretary of state, has said current public school funding is excessive, evidenced by what he claimed are Taj Mahal buildings that look like Fortune 500 companies. Meanwhile, Democratic candidate and state senator Laura Kelly, endorsed by the state teachers union, has pledged to be the education governor and undo damage wrought by recent governor Sam Brownbacks deep tax cuts.

      Whatever their party allegiance, teachers in red states like mine arent waiting for politicians to save them. Last spring in West Virginia, Oklahoma and Kentucky they went on strike to demand better funding. In this years midterm primary elections, Oklahoma educators organized to defeat Republican state House incumbents who voted against raising taxes to fund teacher pay raises. Of the 19 Republicans who voted against the tax increase, eight have been defeated; seven didnt run; and just four have advanced to the general election.

      Amid such a battle over public schoolsthe sole institution through which our children converge and receive opportunities that most families would not afford in a private systemI sometimes wonder what sort of classroom experience I would have had if born 20 or 30 years later than I was. Teachers are as committed as ever, of course, but the system in which they work has been strategically chipped at, falsely discredited and underfunded since I graduated from high school in the late 1990s.

      Those fighting to protect that system are winning. Last spring, the more moderate legislature voted in during the 2016 election approved $500 million in additional funding for Kansas schools, allowing districts to raise teacher salaries and restore cut positions.

      Looking back, I see that public school teachers are not just educators but civic soldiers on the frontlines of democracy. They told me I was smart and could be anything an overreaching statement in a country that has proven to be a plutocracy rather than a meritocracy but one that I believed. Armed with the education and encouragement they had given me, I boldly set my eyes on college, graduate school and the sort of vocation no one from my family had ever known: to get paid for my ideas and creativity rather than for backbreaking or unfulfilling labor.

      A book I started writing many years ago, about working-class women, being broke, and the gritty home I love, will be published this month. Mr Cheatham is not just thanked in the acknowledgments but appears in a passage about the crucial role public education played in my life.

      He doesnt know that. Hes 84, and Ive not seen him in nearly three decades. But recently he appeared on Facebook, commenting about my upcoming book launch at Wichitas local bookseller, Watermark Books.

      There he was, the bushy mustache now thoroughly grayed, in a thumbnail photograph on my laptop screen. There was no hello or its been a long time, as though it was yesterday that I sat in his classroom, when computer screens were green and I had no access to them outside of my public school.

      This was all he typed: Ill be at Watermark with a story you wrote in 1990.

      Sarah Smarshs Heartland: A Memoir of Working Hard and Being Broke in the Richest Country on Earth is out 18 September

      Original Article : HERE ; This post was curated & posted using : RealSpecific

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      Read More Here: The working-class kid who became a writer: how a Kansas teacher helped change my life
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      I grew up on a farm but was able to trade my familys backbreaking labor for a life of writing. My teacher, Mr Cheatham, is partly to thank for this

      ice chips

      Fourth grade shouldve been the hardest year of my early life.

      My parents had divorced during the previous summer and sold the house my dad built with his own hands next to a wheat field. Economic opportunity lacking in rural Kansas, we moved to the city of Wichita. After attending the same small-town school from kindergarten through third grade, I started the academic year in the Wichita school district.

      Series Embed

      A new school, new place, newly divorced parents with new romantic partners big challenges for a nine-year-old whose mom and dad were toiling on construction sites and in retail stock rooms, as opposed to volunteering with the parent-teacher association.

      Yet this began the happiest period of my childhood: the year and a half when Mr Cheatham was my teacher.

      In the basement of our old brick building without air conditioning, where teachers handed out ice chips at the hot start of the school year, Mr Cheatham had built a creative paradise for learning: Art supplies for creating magazine covers that bound our writing. A piano to accompany the plays Mr Cheatham by then a veteran teacher in his 50s, with a thick walrus mustache wrote for us to perform. A shuffle board court painted on the concrete floor, for practicing math as we kept score. A tent that, with a flashlight shone through it, revealed a night sky of constellations for memorizing. A loft, reached by a wooden ladder, stuffed with bean bags and books.

      Mr Cheatham was the teacher designated for advanced learners an opportunity that hadnt existed in my previous rural district and I thus was in his class again in fifth grade.

      Around 1990, I wrote my first bit of memoir in his class. I was from a family midwestern German Catholic farmers that wasnt much on reflecting. The demands of labor kept our eyes looking forward toward the next chore, the next bill, and our stoic culture frowned on self-expression.

      Sarah
      Sarah Smarsh, age 9 during fall 1989, soon after she began fourth grade in a new school district in Wichita, Kan. Photograph: Sarah Smarsh

      But Mr Cheatham had assigned us to write a story. For some reason, rather than making something up, I described a scene from my family, embedded with what I longed for someone to know: That my mom was unhappy, that money was tight, that I felt untethered from my home.

      Mr Cheatham mailed the raw tale to a national childrens magazine which published it as a two-page, illustrated spread. No one I knew had ever had their name in a magazine, let alone as the writer.

      By the time the story made it into print, I had already changed schools again. Largely owing to the chaos of poverty, I would attend eight schools by the time I finished ninth grade from a 2,000-student Wichita high school to a creaking two-room schoolhouse on the prairie containing 33 kids.

      The winter I left Mr Cheathams classroom, my mom took me to the elementary school during holiday break to tell him goodbye. I was wearing a navy wool coat from a discount store and felt embarrassed that my fine blond hair was wild with static from the cold, dry air. It was the last time I saw him.

      Around that time the recent publication of my story an unimaginable joy and validation I started telling my grandma, who was my primary caretaker for much of my upbringing, that someday I would write a book about our family.

      My grandparents left school after sixth and ninth grade to work. In some ways, my family has more in common with the farmers and laborers who often voted against school-district bond issues proposals to fund school renovations with a small tax increase than they do with me, a first-generation college graduate and former English professor.

      But they have always supported my ambitions and, seeing how education gave me opportunities they never had, are defenders of public education.

      Betsy DeVos is trying to get the Fed government to pay for GUNS for teachers, my grandma texted me recently. How insane is that?

      I shared with her that secretary of education DeVos, who would begrudge dollars to public schools and predatory-loan forgiveness to defrauded college students, reportedly owns ten yachts. Someone recently untied one of them, valued at $40 million, from an Ohio dock, setting it adrift on Lake Erie.

      Too bad she wasnt in it, Grandma texted back.

      The privatization DeVos seeks at the federal level began in my home state years ago. School districts sued the state in 1999 and 2010 for failing to provide adequate funding, the Kansas supreme court repeatedly ruled in their favor, and legislators refused to comply a constitutional crisis that Democrats and moderate Republicans have fought to resolve by ousting conservative representatives.

      Those who profit from the dismantling of public schools do so not just with tax dollars funneled into private school vouchers but with their control over information and ideas. One of the most overlooked threats to democracy is classroom curricula shaped by private interests for their own political, ideological and financial benefit.

      The current Kansas gubernatorial race reflects the states 20-year school-funding battle. Republican candidate Kris Kobach, best known for helming Donald Trumps busted voter-fraud commission and for unlawfully suppressing the votes of 30,000 Kansans as secretary of state, has said current public school funding is excessive, evidenced by what he claimed are Taj Mahal buildings that look like Fortune 500 companies. Meanwhile, Democratic candidate and state senator Laura Kelly, endorsed by the state teachers union, has pledged to be the education governor and undo damage wrought by recent governor Sam Brownbacks deep tax cuts.

      Whatever their party allegiance, teachers in red states like mine arent waiting for politicians to save them. Last spring in West Virginia, Oklahoma and Kentucky they went on strike to demand better funding. In this years midterm primary elections, Oklahoma educators organized to defeat Republican state House incumbents who voted against raising taxes to fund teacher pay raises. Of the 19 Republicans who voted against the tax increase, eight have been defeated; seven didnt run; and just four have advanced to the general election.

      Amid such a battle over public schoolsthe sole institution through which our children converge and receive opportunities that most families would not afford in a private systemI sometimes wonder what sort of classroom experience I would have had if born 20 or 30 years later than I was. Teachers are as committed as ever, of course, but the system in which they work has been strategically chipped at, falsely discredited and underfunded since I graduated from high school in the late 1990s.

      Those fighting to protect that system are winning. Last spring, the more moderate legislature voted in during the 2016 election approved $500 million in additional funding for Kansas schools, allowing districts to raise teacher salaries and restore cut positions.

      Looking back, I see that public school teachers are not just educators but civic soldiers on the frontlines of democracy. They told me I was smart and could be anything an overreaching statement in a country that has proven to be a plutocracy rather than a meritocracy but one that I believed. Armed with the education and encouragement they had given me, I boldly set my eyes on college, graduate school and the sort of vocation no one from my family had ever known: to get paid for my ideas and creativity rather than for backbreaking or unfulfilling labor.

      A book I started writing many years ago, about working-class women, being broke, and the gritty home I love, will be published this month. Mr Cheatham is not just thanked in the acknowledgments but appears in a passage about the crucial role public education played in my life.

      He doesnt know that. Hes 84, and Ive not seen him in nearly three decades. But recently he appeared on Facebook, commenting about my upcoming book launch at Wichitas local bookseller, Watermark Books.

      There he was, the bushy mustache now thoroughly grayed, in a thumbnail photograph on my laptop screen. There was no hello or its been a long time, as though it was yesterday that I sat in his classroom, when computer screens were green and I had no access to them outside of my public school.

      This was all he typed: Ill be at Watermark with a story you wrote in 1990.

      Sarah Smarshs Heartland: A Memoir of Working Hard and Being Broke in the Richest Country on Earth is out 18 September

      Original Article : HERE ; This post was curated & posted using : RealSpecific

      =>
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      Read More Here: The working-class kid who became a writer: how a Kansas teacher helped change my life
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      =>

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      3328